CHRISTIAN BONNEFOI
SARAH CHARLESWORTH
LIZ DESCHENES
ROE ETHRIDGE
JUTTA KOETHER
DANIEL LEFCOURT
VALENTINA LIERNUR
JASON LOEBS
SCOTT LYALL
NICK MAUSS
CHARLES MAYTON
JOHN MILLER
OLIVIER MOSSET
SEAN PAUL
EILEEN QUINLAN
BLAKE RAYNE
CLEMENT RODZIELSKI
CHRISTOPH RUCKHÄBERLE
NORA SCHULTZ
AMY SILLMAN
REENA SPAULINGS
JOANNE TATHAM & TOM O’SULLIVAN
CHEYNEY THOMPSON

SCOTT LYALL                                

Born Toronto, Ontario, 1964

Lives and works in New York and Toronto

 

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

 

EDUCATION 

1987 Queens University, Kingston

1990 LL.B., University of Toronto, Toronto

1993 M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts, Valencia

 

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2017 Dragons. SLStudioclone 1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone 1/10/1, Campoli Presti, Paris

DRAGONS, Campoli Presti, London

2015 Black Glass, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2014 Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

A Moveable Feast – Part X, Campoli Presti, Paris

οἴνοπα πόντον, Campoli Presti, London     

2013 Indiscretion, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2011 nudes 3, Campoli Presti, London

nudes, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Sittlichkeit* (roses/pinks), Silver Flag, Montreal

2010 An Immigrant Affection, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Early Video, Susan Hobbs Gallery Inc., Toronto

Scott Lyall and Dan Flavin, Le Commissariat, Paris, curated by Damien Airault

Blake Rayne and Scott Lyall: Rationalisme Appliqué, 1301PE, Los Angeles

2009 Solo/SoloShow (collaboration with Maria Hassabi), Performa 09, PS122, New York

2008 The Color Ball, The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto

Simple Agony, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

2007 the little contemporaries, The Sculpture Center, Long Island City, New York

The Ballroom, Marfa, Texas

PS 122, New York

2006 a dancer dances, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

When Hangover Becomes Form (collaboration with Rachel Harrison),

Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; LACE, Los Angeles

an aaliyah, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

2004 The Canon Copiers, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

2002 OK!lahoma (8087/2000/2002), Art Gallery of York University, Toronto

2001 Scott Lyall, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

Scott Lyall/Josh Blackwell, Goldman/Tevis, Los Angeles

1997-98 Washington Square, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York

1996 Scott Lyall: Plugged and Unplugged, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York

1994 Scott Lyall/Blake Rayne, John Goode Gallery, New York

 

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS AND TWO-PERSON EXHIBITIONS

2016 Poésie Balistique, Fondation d’Entreprise, Hermès, Brussels

Group Exhibition, Campoli Presti, Paris

2015 Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Light Falls, Green On Red Gallery, Dublin

Signal Failure, Pace London, London

Works on Paper, Greene Naftali, New York

2013 Correspondences: Ad Reinhardt at 100, TEMP Art Space, New York

Galerie Perrotin, Paris

2012 Anti-Establishment, BARD College, Annandale-on-Hudson

Ghosts before Breakfast, White Flag Projects, St. Louis, Missouri

I Think And That is All That I Am, Thomas Duncan Gallery, Los Angeles

Accrochage, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2011 Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti) visits Klosterfelde: Liz Deschenes and Scott Lyall, Klosterfelde, Berlin

Double Yolk: Rachel Harrison and Scott Lyall, Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp

Hasta Mañana, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York

Chopped & Screwed, MKG127, Toronto

Schnitte im Raum, (Rachel Harrison and Scott Lyall), Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen

With One Color, curated by Paul McCabe, Van de Weghe Fine Art, New York

Tentation d’Hazard: The Montreal Biennial (MTL BNL), Montreal, PQ

From New York to London: the Medium of Contingency, Thomas Dane Gallery,  London

2010 Superviscous, curated by Charles Reeves, Ontario College of Art Professional  Gallery

Rationalisme Appliqué, Collaboration with Blake Rayne, 1301PE, Los Angeles

Dan Flavin & Scott Lyall, two person show with Dan Flavin, Le Commissariat, Paris

2009 Stonescape, The Art Cave, Calistoga, California

Collatéral  (with Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Sean Paul, Eileen Quinlan, Blake Rayne, Nora Schultz, Cheyney Thompson), Le Confront Moderne-Centre pour l’Art  Contemporain, Poitiers

The Lining of Forgetting  (with Edgar Arseneaux, Louise Bourgeois, John Coplans, Dinh Q. Lê, Chris Marker Kerry Tribe, Rachel Whiteread), Austin Museum of Art, Texas

Practice vs. Object, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

CODE SHARE: 5 Continents, 10 Biennials, 20 artists, Contemporary Art  Center (ACA), Vilnius,

2008 Novel, Anna-Catharina Gebbers Bilbiothekswohnung, Berlin

The 7th SITE Santa Fe Biennial, SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico, curated by Lance Fung

The Lining of Forgetting, curated by Xandra Eden, Weatherspoon Museum, Greensboro, North Carolina

Momentum, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

2007 24 November – 22 December, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Regroup Show, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Scott Lyall, Maria Hassabi, Gloria, PS 122, New York

Scott Lyall, Maria Hassabi, Gloria, The Ballroom, Marfa,Texas

Massiv Analog Academy, organized by John Kelsey and Gareth James, Galerie  Christian Nagel, Cologne

For the People of Paris, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris (cat.)

Form as Memory, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2006 When Hangover Becomes Form (collaboration with Rachel Harrison), Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver

When Hangover Becomes Form (collaboration with Rachel Harrison), LACE, Los Angeles

Hands Up/Hands Down, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

We Can Do This Now, curated by Gregory Burke and Helena Reckett, The Power Plant, Toronto

2004 Yarns, Solomon Fine Art, Seattle

Scott Lyall, Roe Ethridge, Blake Rayne, Greener Pastures, Toronto

2003 Psychotopes, curated by Markus Müller, YYZ Artists Outlet, Toronto

Scott Lyall, Brandon Latau, Cory McCorkle, Goldman Tevis Gallery, Los Angeles

Mary Goldman Gallery, Los Angeles

2001 Scott Lyall/Josh Blackwell, Goldman/Tevis, Los Angeles

2000 New York Projects, curated by Luke Dowd, Delfina, London

1999 Construction Drawings, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, KunstWerke, Berlin

1998 Architecture! Architecture! Architecture!, Hunter College, Times Square Gallery, New York

Construction Drawings, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, P.S. 1, New York

e pluribus nihil, curated by Colin De Land, American Fine Arts Inc., New York

1996 Copiacabana, curated by K. Gookin/R. Kahn, Museo Estrameno, Lisbon                      

1995 ReZone, curated by Donald Carroll, Diverse Works Gallery, Houston

Club Berlin, Kunstshaft Site, Biennale de Venezia, Venice

1994 Scott Lyall, Blake Rayne, John Goode Gallery, New York

1993 04/30/1993, Rainforest Apartments, Hollywood, CA

The Los Angeles Thing, ICA, London; Glasgow College of Art, Glasgow, Scotland

Real, Post, Other, The Municipal Building, Los Angeles

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

2014 Bakst, Grace Lauren, Dance Interview: Scott Lyall and Maria Hassabi, BOMB Magazine, February 11

2011 Martin Herbert, “Campoli Presti nudes 3”, London Reviews Marathon, Art Review, Issue 56     

Aude Launay “A Certain Idea of White”, Scott Lyall, Hugo Pernet and Bertrand Planes, 02, Autumn 2011

Lyall, Scott. “Artist’s On Ab-Ex: Scott Lyall”, Art Forum, 2011

McKay, Robin. “The Medium of Contingency”, Ridinghouse Press, London, 2011

2010 Anon. Contemporary Art Daily, October 21, 2010

Rhodes, Richard (ed). “See it: Scott Lyall In-Between Times”, Canadian Art, April 8, 2010

2009 Adler, Dan. “Scott Lyall: Power Plant, Toronto”, Artforum, January, p.205

Rudd, Claire. “The Lining of Forgetting, Austin Museum of Art Review. …might be good”, Fluent Collaborative, Issue #24, June

Burke, Gregory/ Linsley, Robert/ Busta, Caroline/ Lyall, Scott, Scott Lyall: The Color Ball, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2009

Burton, Johanna. “Not a Single Point of View: Contemporary Sculpture and the   Spatial Imaginary” in State of the Art: Contemporary Sculpture,                          

Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin 2009;

New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2009

Lewis, David. Critics’ Picks: “Collatéral” (review) Artforum.com, 11 August 2009

Matotek, Jennifer. FOCUS: Scott Lyall, SWITCH, Winter 2008/2009

Rees, Simon (ed). “Code Share”, The Contemporary Art Centre, Lithuania (ex.brochure).

Airault, Damien. “Le speculation par l’asymetrie”, Deuxieme Agence, Vol 34, August 2009.

2008 Antonova, Iliana. “Best of 2008: The color Ball, SNAP!”, December, 2008

Jager, David. Allusive, elusive Scott Lyall, NOW Magazine, 24 Sept- Oct, 2008

Carson, Andrea. VoCA suggests… viewoncanadianart.com, 29 August 2008

Fairfield, Doug. SITE out of luck, Santa Fe New Mexican, 31 July 2008

Chisholm, Christie. “Come Out and Play – Lucky Number Seven at SITE Santa Fe”. Alibi.com, V.17 No.27, July 3 – 9

Helfand, Greg. SITE Santa Fe takes leap of faith, ARTINFO.com, 1 July 2008

Fung, Lance (exhibition catalogue), Lucky Number Seven, Santa Fe, New Mexico: SITE   Sante Fe, 2008

Gopnik, Blake. “A site for Thinking Outside the Box”, The Washington Post, July 6, 2008

Milroy, Sarah. The idea of a bright tomorrow is so yesterday, The Globe and Mail, 20 Septembre 2008

Sandals, Leah. Dusseldorf Do, NOW Magazine, 17-24 July 2008

Cook, Sarah/ Eden, Xandra/ Roberts, Eden (exhibition catalogue). The Lining of Forgetting Greensboro, North Carolina: Weatherspoon Art Museum, 2008

Lyall, Scott (essay) in Novel, Williams, Matt and Rowlands, Alun, eds. Lecture Meant to Accompany the Consumption of a Multiple. Berlin/London: Anna Catharina Gebbers Bibliothekswohnung/Hyphen Press, 2008

Finkel, Jori. Welcome to New Mexico. Now create. The New York Times, 27 January 2008

Gopnik, Blake. “Best of 2008”. The Washington Post, 2008

2007 Rhodes, Richard (ed). “Toronto Now: The Moment”, Canadian Art, Winter 2007, pp 58-59

Milroy, Sarah. A meeting of art, power and the city. The Globe and Mail, 10 January

For the People of Paris, Sutton Lane, Paris, 2007

Linsley, Robert, Around the Episcene, Vancouver: Old Mill Books, 2007

2006 Saltz, Jerry. All Art is Contemporary Art. Modern Painters, November 2006

Schmerler, Sarah. Scott Lyall, a dancer dance. Time Out New York,12-18 October 2006                 

Rinebold, Mary. Orchard Underground. artnet.com, 7 September 2006

Miles, Christopher. Part of the package: Scott Lyall and Rachel Harrison remain  true to themselves, but also accessorize each other, in their first collaboration, at  LACE. Los Angeles Times, 14 August 2006

Adler, Dan. When Hangover Becomes Form. Vancouver: Contemporary Art Gallery,2006

Bonham-Carter, Charlotte. “Stuck On You”. ArtReview, June, p.25.                                      

Goddard, Peter. “Take a walk on the Smelly Side”. The Toronto Star, April 1    

Hamilton, Emily Elisa. “The High Concept No Concept Art Show”. MAG, April            

Lacanian Ink 28, (New York: Ayretsa: November 2006), image reproduction               

Mahovsky, Trevor, “Rachel Harrison and Scott Lyall at the Contemporary Art Gallery”, in Artforum, May (Illustration)

Saltz, Jerry, “New York Journal”, in Modern Painters, November, p. 58

2004 Eden, Xandra. “Scott Lyall, Susan Hobbs Gallery”. Canadian Art, Summer, p. 92-93

Tevis, John, Yarns (Seattle, WA: Independent Publication) / exhibition catalogue

2002 Adler, Dan. “Scott Lyall: Susan Hobbs Gallery”. Zing Magazine, Number 177,

Dault, Gary Michael. “Scott Lyall at Susan Hobbs”. The Globe and Mail, January 5

Adler, Dan/ Lyall, Scott. Scott Lyall: Ok!lahoma. Toronto: Art Gallery of York  University, 2002

Hanna, Deirdre. “Random Reason”. NOW Magazine, January 3-9

2001 Milroy, Sarah. “Critics’ Choice”. The Globe and Mail, December 15

2000 Roberts, Alison. “A Brooklyn Cheer for the British Art Scene”. Evening Standard,  August 1

Rattameyer, Christian, “Garage hier, Landschaft da”, in Blitz Review, http://blitzreview.de (Illustration)

Ratman, Neru. “Gallery Controlled Diet”. The Face, August

Schmitz, Edgar. “New York Projects”, Kunstforum, November-December, p.48

1998 Ballengee, Brian, et al. “Mob Rule #9, Sacred Cows and Dead Horse”. NY Arts Magazine, February-March, p.6-7

Greene, David A. “Scott Lyall, Greene Naftali Gallery”, Frieze, Issue 39, March-April, p. 88-89

Millet, Catherine, ed. “Exporama”, in Art Presse, February (Illustration)

Pedrosa, Adriano. “Scott Lyall, Greene Naftali Gallery”. ArtForum, Summer, p.135

Schmerler, Sarah. “Scott Lyall”. Time Out New York, Number 122, January, p. 46

1996 Ichihuri, Kentaro, “I Am Going Around the World”, in BT Contemporary Art, June (Illustration)

Servertar, Stuart, “Scott Lyall, Greene Naftali Gallery”, New York Press, February 28 – March 5

1995 Edwards, Thomas. “Artists Work to Redefine their Spaces”. Houston Post, March 6

1993 Gookin, Kirby; Kahn, Robin; eds., Promotional Copy. New York, 1993

24 November – 22 December

24 Nov, 2007-22 Dec, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

nudes

19 May, 2011-18 Jun, 2011

Campoli Presti, Paris

nudes 3

15 Oct, 2011-17 Dec, 2011

Campoli Presti, London

Scott Lyall
nudes 3
15 October – 17 December 2011
Campoli Presti, London

Campoli Presti is pleased to present nudes 3 by Scott Lyall. This will be the artist’s second solo show in London, and his fourth exhibition with the gallery.

Lyall’s title, nudes, can be interpreted as a charm. (Charme in French: incantation, intonation; a key search.) But the title is also given as an image under erasure, according to a formula that recurs in written thought: ‘since a word is inaccurate, it must be crossed out. Since some word is necessary, the chosen word remains legible.’ (Heidegger). The nudes are graphic assemblages combining ink and its erasure in multiple passes of canvas through a UV-based printer. Lyall’s procedure sequences ink in sheer layers of application so that the gradient color-deposits are mixed directly onto the field. There is no graphic image that pre-exists this on a screen because the color information is sent directly to the print heads. At stake is a movement from pure quantity to the figure without the mediation of an ‘image’ from the regime of graphic design. Each nude becomes an expression of almost negative saturation, undecidable between the veiling and laying bare of what is seen.

An interesting occurrence apropos of the UV printer is that each nude attains a warm and very subtle residual tan. (This effect is the result of long exposures from multiple passes.) There is therefore an index of rays ‘beyond color’ that affect the tonal assemblage by subtly calibrating the whole. You would think that UV exposure would only bleach these sheets of color. But in fact it works to fix them. It sears them in and cures the tone. The result is neither perception, pure and simple, nor an image. Lyall sees these special effects as the nude’s emergent quality, a kind of sacrifice of abstraction and mechano-graphic (conceptual) thought.
***

‘Paul Valéry spent his mornings writing thoughts about mathematics. He said he earned the right to be stupid –intuitive, moved—the rest of the day. I will say: the difference between mathematics and emotion, between an empty symbolic quantity and a meaningful plastic art– between a figure in circulation and the self who must have summoned it— is discharge, sprays of fog, the sublimation of ink itself.’ (-S. Lyall)

Scott Lyall was born in Canada, and works in New York and Toronto. Recent exhibitions of the nudes and related works include Sutton Lane (Paris), Klosterfelde (Berlin), Greene Naftali (New York), Miguel Abreu Gallery (New York), Galerie Christian Nagel (Antwerp Project Space), and the Montreal Biennial. Other exhibitions include The Color Ball (solo exhibition at The Power Plant, Toronto) and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial. Lyall’s work will next appear as part of Art Nova (Art|Basel| Miami Beach with Campoli Presti), and in a solo exhibition at Silver Flag (Montreal).

A Moveable Feast – Part X

13 Jun, 2014-28 Jun, 2014

Campoli Presti, Paris

A Moveable Feast – Part X
Scott Lyall
13 – 28 June 2014
Campoli Presti, Paris

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce the tenth part of A Moveable Feast with a solo presentation by Scott Lyall. The exhibition is comprised of new works on laminated glass and printed canvases.

The exhibition continues Lyall’s research on the status of digital colour as a code that is constantly translated, transformed, and materialized; continually delaying or deferring its meaning.

The printing technique used for these works extends this act of translation as it turns information directly into colour. The canvases are produced by combining ink and its erasure, in multiple passes, through a UV-based printer. Lyall’s procedure sequences ink in sheer layers of application so that the gradient colour-deposits are mixed directly onto the field. Since the colour information is sent directly to the print heads there is no graphic image that pre-exists this on a screen. The colors are completely written out of quantities.

Following a similar procedure, Lyall’s glass works consist of two panes of museum glass printed on both the front and rear surfaces. Ink is also infused between the glass sheets and into the laminate, making colour the bonding component of the work – not its mere surface but literally its content. The non- contrasting, non-colored surface suggest Ad Reinhardt’s conception of black as the absence of color.
Offering neither a promise nor a threat digital shares the interpretive ambiguity of the term /pharmakon/ as understood by Jacques Derrida. Lyall’s colors, in turn, are a treatment, a poisoning or a cure, an elixir, a charm, a spell, a powder or a pigment, make up, ink and colored paint. They are something with no stable essence, no proper characteristics nor any necessary material manifestation; therefore these marks exist only as a trace. In Lyall’s works, color does not reflect its surroundings but points to a view at the depth of the horizon. It’s the color of the compression of light, and at the same time, par excellence, the color of a compressed digital file.

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. He has held a solo institutional exhibition at The Power Plant, Toronto in 2008 with an accompanying catalogue. Past exhibitions include Campoli Presti, London; Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial, and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Group exhibition celebrating Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagners donation to the Whitney and Pompidou

09 Jun, 2016-15 Jul, 2016

Campoli Presti, Paris

Liz Deschenes / Jutta Koether / Daniel Lefcourt / Scott Lyall / Sean Paul / Eileen Quinlan / Blake Rayne / Reena Spaulings / Cheyney Thompson
10 June – 23 July 2016
Campoli Presti, Paris

Campoli Presti is pleased to present a group exhibition featuring works by Liz Deschenes, Jutta Koether, Daniel Lefcourt, Scott Lyall, Sean Paul, Eileen Quinlan, Blake Rayne, Reena Spaulings and Cheyney Thompson. This generation of artists, which the gallery has represented since the beginning, has markedly contributed to redefine notions on medium-specificity and artistic agency. Their work was recently included in the exhibition “Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner” at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York which has travelled to the Centre Pompidou in Paris and is currently on view.

Making use of the medium’s most elemental aspects, namely paper, light, and chemicals, Liz Deschenes has recently worked without a camera to produce reflective photograms. These are obtained by exposing sheets of photosensitive paper to the ambient light of night before fixing them with silver toner. Deschenes’ work is increasingly concerned with architectural and historical contexts of exhibition display. Spatial factors and tangible conditions of display become inscribed in the physicality of the artwork rendering the photograph as a framing-device that intends to ‘bracket’ the space and activate the viewer. The reflective surface of the new photograms on view engages the movements of the viewer and the surrounding architecture.

Jutta Koether’s practice often involves appropriations of literature and art history masters, negotiating questions of aesthetic consensus and of the social-economical networks in which artistic practice operates. Based on Helios and Phaeton by Nicolas Poussin, Koether’s work presented in the exhibition alludes to the geometrical landmark of Western Art while defining a field of play. Locked in the material structure around it, the figure is engaged in a broader movement, organising different zones of contact. By addressing the attraction between archaism and metrics, Koether’s systematic application of paint engages the viewer in a micro-contemplation, comparable to the visual experience of picking up pennies from the ground. The painting forms part of a broader series of works that explores the allegorical figure of Fortune’s wheel and the medieval goddess Fortuna, a metaphor of role of chance in time’s passage.

Throughout his career, Daniel Lefcourt has continually engaged the space between painting and technical imaging. Lefcourt’s work reflects on contemporary image production and the digital economy of images while negotiating the reality of material procedures. His production techniques use aspects of photography, computer modelling, digital fabrication, and sculptural casting. For his Plot Fill and Cast series, Lefcourt has used computer-controlled router, digital scanning and machining techniques as the basis for a play with written and visual communication and the languages of painting. His new body of work from 2016 collapses both series, exploring the space between writing, drawing and painting. Entirely mechanically produced, Untitled (Machine Painting), 2016 is based on geometric drawings that program the path of the brush. Developed from Lefcourt’s interest in digital technologies, the works push the boundaries of painting, juxtaposing the mechanical with the chance of the material.

Scott Lyall’s recent series of works research on the status of digital colour as a code that is constantly translated, transformed, and materialized; continually delaying or deferring its meaning. His printing technique extends this act of translation as it turns information directly into colour. The canvases are produced by combining ink and its erasure, in multiple passes, through a UV-based printer. These graphic assemblages of colour data – ‘non-images’ in a certain way – form visual atmospheres that shift depending on different viewpoints, inscribing within the process an actual experience of ‘colour’.

In Sean Paul’s Arrangement 15, Front/Top/Bottom/Right/Left/Back, a still life assembled from domestic products (cup, bowl, saucer, and plate) is marked with black squares of tape; the black squares function as tokens, which allow the spatial geometry of the still life to be discerned. Following standard practices of technical representation, used for example in the fields of architecture or product design, the still life is pictured from six perpendicular planes forming a box of views composed of the front, back, left, right, top and bottom angles. This plane then becomes the array, which informs the material images’ unfolding into lived space, or a domestic scene. Madame Leblanc, Rerversed, 2012 is based on the Ingres masterpiece “Madame Leblanc”. This print admits 4 different folds, therefore 8 possible configurations on the wall. It is imagined as being folded upon an idealized architectural plane. The type of fold represented above is mapped into a 90 degree convex angle of an existing space.

Eileen Quinlan explores photography’s capacity to be both record of physical facts and deceptive illusion. Employing analogue techniques in an era of digital manipulation, Quinlan creates atmospheric abstract images using the standard tricks of commercial film photography. Based entirely in the studio, Quinlan’s work uses pre-digital photography techniques—such as gels, strobes, smoke and mirrors—to create mesmerizing abstract compositions of light, colour, and texture. Her works recall the pure abstraction of Modernist painting, but are actually direct representations of the items used to create backdrops in commercial photography. The polaroid plays an important role in Quinlan’s practice, often employed as a first take when photographing the still lifes she stages in the studio.

Blake Rayne’s last series of paintings related to his interest in recording sequential streams of movement into painting, drawing a continuous wandering line throughout the picture plane. Rayne freely paints the line tracing the surface in an intuitive movement that recalls automatic writing techniques, evoking the wandering and errant traces of digital interfaces. His new body of work from 2016 further explores these concerns by collapsing line and process. For Untitled, 2016 a steel banding commonly used in the shipment of crates was utilized as a soft stencil to create a white looping line lightly dusted with aerated acrylic paint in layers of various colours. The paperclips that initially held the banding together were released to allow for expansion into the final shape of each of the line compositions, now appearing as silhouettes.

Reena Spaulings’ The Dealers (2007) and The New Dealers (2013) were portraits of gallerists based on images downloaded from Artforum.com’s ‘Scene & Herd’ and other art world-related websites depicting friends and professional colleagues that Spaulings worked with over the years. The portraits from 2013 – the second instalment of the series first shown at Kunsthalle Zürich in 2007 – featured a more recent generation of art dealers, exposing the increasing social interests that rule the art market by turning the traders into commodities themselves. Executed in active brushstrokes the portraits play with various features of expressionist figurative painting from the 80s, such as the preference for parody or working from found images. These irreverent portraits of prominent gallerists reflect Spaulings’ interest in art’s status as an exchangeable commodity, whilst addressing the specific displacements, social networks and ambiguities Reena Spaulings inhabits in her double identity of both artist and gallerist. The Complete Dealers features a rack with promotional postcards based on the paintings of both generations of dealers, on a display that evokes their rotating popularity and the visibility features of a retro marketing tool.

Cheyney Thompson’s work focuses on the technology, production and distribution of painting within the context of current abstract economy. Thompson presents us with a visual equivalency for the intangibly complex processes governing our economic systems. The works on paper on view are based on the « Drunken Walk » algorithm, an aleatory path that is used in financial theory to predict stock prices. The algorithm belongs to the study of certain seemingly random types of motion, from botanist Robert Brown’s 19th-century observations of pollen floating on water as well as mathematician Louis Bachelier’s early 20th-centry application of Brown to model fluctuations in stock markets. In this case the “random walk” taken by Thompson’s entity produced a new sequence of values, which he then mapped onto a path, akin to the path of a labyrinth.

***

Liz Deschenes’ work is part of the permanent collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris; MoMA, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C; Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on Hudson. Deschenes has an upcoming survey exhibition at the ICA Boston opening on 28th June. She recently had solo exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and at MASSMoCA, North Adams. Deschenes’ work was recently included in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner at the Whitney Museum, New York and in Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions at MoMA, New York. Past exhibitions include a solo exhibition at Secession, Vienna (2012-2013); the Whitney Biennial 2012 and Parcours at the Art Institute of Chicago with Florian Pumhösl (2013).

Jutta Koether was born in Cologne in 1958. She lives and works between New York and Berlin. Her work forms part of the permanent collections of MoMA, New York; the Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris; Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles; Nationalgalerie in Berlin and Kunsthalle Bern. Koether has an upcoming survey exhibition at Brandhorst Museum, Munich in 2017. Her work was part of Painting 2.0, Expression in the Information Age at Brandhorst Museum travelling to Mumok, Vienna. Koether has had solo exhibitions at DCA – Dundee Contemporary Arts (2013); Arnolfini, Bristol (2013); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2011), Bergen Kunsthall, Norway (2008); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2007) and Kölnischer Kunstverein, Cologne (2006). She was included in the Shanghai Biennial in 2014, in the Whitney Biennial in 2012 and 2006 and in the 2012 Sao Paulo Biennial.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in New York. His work forms part of the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and MOCA – Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Lefcourt’s work was recently on view at the Whitney Museum, New York in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner. His work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including MoMA P.S.1; the Sculpture Center, Long Island City; ICA Philadelphia; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Malmö Konstmuseum and Kunst-Werke Berlin. In 2013 the Dia Art Foundation commissioned a web project by the artist. He received his MFA from Columbia University and is a member of the faculty of Rhode Island School of Design.

Scott Lyall is part of the collection of the Whitney Museum, New York. Lyall’s work was recently on view at the Whitney Museum, New York as part of Collected by Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagner. Past exhibitions include The Colour Ball at The Power Plant in Toronto (solo); the little contemporaries at Sculpture Center, New York (solo); When Hangover Becomes Form (with Rachel Harrison), Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; Anti-Establishment, curated by Johanna Burton, at the CCS Bard Hessel Museum; Schnitte im Raum, Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen; Tentation d’Hazard, The Montreal Biennial 2011; Collatéral, Le Confort Moderne, Poitiers; The Lining of Forgetting, Austin Museum of Art, Weatherspoon Art Museum; and SITE Santa Fe, 7th International Biennial 2008.

Sean Paul (b. 1978 in Salt Lake City, Utah) lives and works in New York. He received a MFA from Columbia University, NY. Past solo exhibitions include Communication in the Presence of Noise and Service Relations, Thomas Duncan Gallery, Los Angeles; A Moveable Feast, Part II, Campoli Presti, Paris; and Every Hair of the Bear, Front Desk Apparatus, New York and Symposium, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London. Recent group exhibitions include Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Blueprints, Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY and Collatéral, Le Confort Moderne, Centre pour l’Art Contemporain, Poitiers.

Eileen Quinlan lives and works in New York. Her work is included in public collections such as MoMA, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and FRAC (Fonds Regional d’Art Contemporain), France. Her work was recently shown at the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens and presented at Bergen Kunsthall, Norway in 2015. It formed part of Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner at Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015/16) and New Photography 2013, curated by Roxana Marcoci at MoMA, New York. Quinlan had a two-person exhibition at The Kitchen, New York in 2012 and a solo exhibition at the ICA in Boston in 2009.

Blake Rayne lives and works in New York. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and Fonds Regional d’Art Contemporain, France (FRAC). His upcoming survey solo exhibition at the Blaffer Art Museum de Houston, Texas will open in October 2016. His work recently was on view at the Whitney Museum, New York in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner. Past exhibitions include Künstlerhaus Graz, Austria (2013), Langen Foundation, Germany (2011), Kunsthalle Bergen (2010), The Kitchen, New York (2010) and Le Confort Moderne, Poitiers (2009).

Cheyney Thompson has had solo exhibitions at the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (with an accompanying monograph), and the Kunstverein Braunschweig, Germany; and his work was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. Group shows include: Une Histoire, Centre Pompidou, Paris, Chat Jet – Painting ‘Beyond’ The Medium at Künstlerhaus Graz; The Indiscipline of Painting, Tate St. Ives; Systems Analysis at West London Projects and Langen Foundation, Germany; Greater New York at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center and The Venice Biennale, Italy in 2003.

For more information or images please contact Ines Dahn ines@campolipresti.com

Sutton Lane Visits Klosterfelde

15 Jul, 2011-03 Sep, 2011

Klosterfelde, Berlin

Sutton Lane Visits Klosterfelde
Liz Deschenes / Scott Lyall
15 July – 3 September 2011
Klosterfelde, Berlin

Sutton Lane is pleased to present a two person exhibition by Liz Deschenes and Scott Lyall as part of a gallery exchange with Klosterfelde.

On view are three photograms by Liz Deschenes and four paintings by Scott Lyall from the nude series along with an adhesive vinyl.

Deschenes uses the exploration of photographic processes as a tool to investigate photography itself, the way the medium has been positioned and historicized as well as its relationship to other practices. The language and mechanisms of photography are self-consciously referenced and activate questions of representation and modes of seeing. The black photograms are camera less, reflective photographs which are the result of exposing photosensitive paper to light. Conceived as corner pieces they activate the surrounding architecture, functioning as a brace for the space and the other works in the exhibition.

The works by Scott Lyall are unique printouts in which pale colours derive from mathematical interpolations. The image which is composited to run continuously across the support is made up of digital files containing thousands of different colours. These works suggest a penumbral, shimmering light, and appear to be -indeed- nude, but they are actually the result of successive layers of colour applied to canvas or vinyl. In the case of the vinyl adhesives, only a sale or a curatorial request calls a new work into being. In this sense, this series of works highlights the contemporary economy of speculative value.

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. Her work is part of the permanent collections of The Walker Art Center; The Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum, New York; the Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C.; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on- Hudson.

Scott Lyall works in both New York and Toronto. He recently had a solo exhibition at the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto. Past group exhibitions include PS122 (New York), The SculptureCenter (New York), and the Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver).

Sutton Lane will present new works by both artists at abc – art berlin contemporary this September.

οἴνοπα πόντον

10 Apr, 2014-24 May, 2014

Campoli Presti, London

Scott Lyall
οἴνοπα πόντον
10 April – 24 May 2014
Campoli Presti, London

Campoli Presti is pleased to present Scott Lyall’s fourth solo exhibition with the gallery that comprises a new series of printed works on laminated glass and printed canvases, combining similar production techniques yet manifesting different formal outcomes.

The exhibition takes its title from the Ancient Greek expression ‘οἴνοπα πόντον’ whose translation ‘wine dark sea’ has been debated by scholars and treated as a poetic mystery, referring to colour’s inherent phenomenological and linguistically determined character.

Lyall’s large ink paintings arise from one isolated digital pixel, whose colour information is directly sent to print heads bypassing the mediation of pre-existing images. In the series Black Glass (2014) each work consists of two panes of museum glass laminated together – the laminating material itself being infused with ink. Colour is suspended directly in the glass, then the outer faces are printed, sealing the work and darkening it. These graphic assemblages of colour data – ‘non-images’ in a certain way – form visual atmospheres that shift depending on different viewpoints, inscribing within the process an actual experience of ‘colour’.

οἴνοπα πόντον meditates on the tensions that exist between the assertion of relativity and the standardisation of colour experience by industrial colour models. Digital information is translated, transformed and materialised producing visual equivalents of ‘nothingness’ – opening up not to an ‘endgame’ or an image of the ‘last painting’, but to an initial ground. The works complicate the digital circulation and consumption of images, inviting a multiplicity of readings – naked exposure to, relief in, perpetuation of – the aleatory.

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. He has held a solo institutional exhibition at The Power Plant, Toronto in 2008 with an accompanying catalogue. Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

DRAGONS

06 Oct, 2017-09 Mar, 2018

Campoli Presti, London

Scott Lyall
DRAGONS
6 October – 9 March 2017
Campoli Presti, London

Colours explode on the scales of DRAGONS: calculated, fabricated (etched by robots), deliberately artificially hallucinated, colours. Non-negated light. These are real-time performances. They are playing on a surface even smaller than a smart phone. But DRAGONS’ scales array the farthest lining of the cosmos.

No one gets to visualize the scales of these DRAGONS. Describing their materials is perhaps a lost cause. Here, the list includes: digital images of starlight; redshift phenomena in the silt of nebulae; aluminum Nano-particles and sub-visible wavelengths; a colour-splitting algorithm; adhesives; a polymer; light on white walls (both natural and fluorescent); our brain; the ‘human cave’ we call geometry; our eyes. The largest scale of things is impressed on the smallest. Colours are ‘hallucinations of skin’ (Empedocles).

Millennia will pass before these iridescences—our signals—can alight on the lining of the cosmos. The DRAGONS will be touched by each contrasting hue. Every single instant of the real-time performance will increase the scaly surface of the universe by one. The DRAGONS coax whatever to its cosmological power. Once and only once—but once, again (Lee Smolin).

“Find your pile of gold and fall asleep on it,” they’d say. Hallucinate a History, the Beautiful, the Ancestor, the colours of Sardanapalus, the Shoemaker’s little elves. Dream about a second before the big bang happened, about a secret mother Philosopher, about a ‘smaller-element, still.

Do DRAGONS sense the colours, or the explosions? (Delacroix)

Not that this could rouse even the most ticklish DRAGON, for whom facticity, contingency, and our stories are so obvious.   

Dragons. SLStudio.clone 1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone 1/10/1

09 Sep, 2017-26 Sep, 2017

Campoli Presti, Paris

Scott Lyall
Dragons
SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September
Opening 9 September
Campoli Presti, Paris

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.
Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.
Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.
His recent works employ Nanomedia lithography, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.
These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.
The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.
The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

simple agony

19 Jan, 2008-23 Feb, 2008

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

Scott Lyall
simple agony
January 19 – February 23, 2008
Sutton Lane, London

Sutton Lane is pleased to announce simple agony by Scott Lyall, the first solo exhibition of the artist’s work outside America. The exhibition presents a metrical distribution of varied elements, including quasi-sculpture, painting, graphic design, and colour photography.

Simple Agony is also the title of a poem by Jules LaForgue, written in Paris in 1869, before the ‘abstract’ revolution. But already present within the poem is the dual subject of high modernism: a work committed to both the imagery of fading romantic aspirations, and the graphic condition of language within an evolving world of abstractions. Lyall highlights this division within the heart of modern poetry to both account for and extend the two dimensions of abstract painting. One notices in his work a kind of analytic constructivism in which the medium is reduced to a distribution of cultural signs; but, there is also an excess of lyrical gesture and painterly value that seems to incessantly want to incorporate (or maybe redeem) a fleeting subject. No meta-language exists to enable the viewers in the gallery to grasp and consolidate these two dimensions from a neutral critical standpoint. This is not because the dimensions are simply opposite or incompatible, but because they are knotted inextricably, and always impede on one another. A sensuous meter has been installed within the rational construction, while the scheme of the latter intervenes and seeks to contain the flickering objects.

But it is thus that one encounters the simple agony of Lyall’s title. If an agon describes the conflict within its dramaturgical setting –a core of inconsistency around which sentiment and rational perspectives must mutually circulate- then this is also the (absent) principle that guides Lyall’s definition of abstraction. The show’s elements were prepared autonomously on the interface of a computer, and first appeared as screen graphics before they were cast as display objects. This condition of coming from nothing (except a compressed field of information) is both a repetition and a travesty of historical notions of art’s autonomy. But historic reference is produced as the sign of a virtual past only. It’s just the potential for recollection and speculative thought in this ensemble.

To aid him in his process, Lyall includes images of his Assistants, a set of self-portraits made by strangers, posted via cell phones to various web sites. These are the fragmentary images from a virtual community of the anonymous, but they help to ‘soften’ the hard abstractions by which the show has been assembled. And, like every element of Lyall’s production, they only exist within the time-frame of their presentation. This is an art that wants to present us with the simple motifs of its development, linking the figures of a shattered and irredeemable abstraction to (each of) its multiple, provisional and highly speculative places.

Scott Lyall was born in Toronto, Canada, and works in both New York and Toronto. He has exhibited his work widely in the United States and Canada, most recently at PS122 (New York), The SculptureCenter (New York), and the Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver). Exhibitions are currently planned for the 7th SITE Santa Fe Biennial (June 2008), Art39Basel Premiere (with Blake Rayne and the Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York), and the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto.