CHRISTIAN BONNEFOI
LIZ DESCHENES
ROE ETHRIDGE
JUTTA KOETHER
DANIEL LEFCOURT
VALENTINA LIERNUR
JASON LOEBS
SCOTT LYALL
NICK MAUSS
CHARLES MAYTON
JOHN MILLER
OLIVIER MOSSET
SEAN PAUL
JULIA PHILLIPS
EILEEN QUINLAN
BLAKE RAYNE
CLEMENT RODZIELSKI
CHRISTOPH RUCKHÄBERLE
NORA SCHULTZ
AMY SILLMAN
REENA SPAULINGS
JOANNE TATHAM & TOM O’SULLIVAN
CHEYNEY THOMPSON

SCOTT LYALL                                

 

BIOGRAPHY

Born Toronto, Ontario, 1964

Lives and works in New York and Toronto

 

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

 

EDUCATION 

1987            Queens University, Kingston

1990            LL.B., University of Toronto, Toronto

1993            M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts, Valencia

 

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2017          Dragons. SLStudioclone 1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone 1/10/1, Campoli Presti, Paris

                   DRAGONS, Campoli Presti, London

2015           Black Glass, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2014           Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

                    A Moveable Feast – Part X, Campoli Presti, Paris

                    οἴνοπα πόντον, Campoli Presti, London     

2013           Indiscretion, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2011            nudes 3, Campoli Presti, London

                    nudes, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

                    Sittlichkeit* (roses/pinks), Silver Flag, Montreal

2010           An Immigrant Affection, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

                    Early Video, Susan Hobbs Gallery Inc., Toronto

                    Scott Lyall and Dan Flavin, Le Commissariat, Paris, curated by Damien Airault

                    Blake Rayne and Scott Lyall: Rationalisme Appliqué, 1301PE, Los Angeles

2009          Solo/SoloShow (collaboration with Maria Hassabi), Performa 09, PS122, New York

2008          The Color Ball, The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto

                    Simple Agony, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

2007           the little contemporaries, The Sculpture Center, Long Island City, New York

                     The Ballroom, Marfa, Texas

                     PS 122, New York

2006           a dancer dances, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

                     When Hangover Becomes Form (collaboration with Rachel Harrison),

                     Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; LACE, Los Angeles

                     an aaliyah, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

2004           The Canon Copiers, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

2002           OK!lahoma (8087/2000/2002), Art Gallery of York University, Toronto

2001            Scott Lyall, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

                     Scott Lyall/Josh Blackwell, Goldman/Tevis, Los Angeles

1997-98      Washington Square, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York

1996            Scott Lyall: Plugged and Unplugged, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York

1994            Scott Lyall/Blake Rayne, John Goode Gallery, New York

 

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS AND TWO-PERSON EXHIBITIONS

2016            Poésie Balistique, Fondation d’Entreprise, Hermès, Brussels

                     Group Exhibition, Campoli Presti, Paris

2015            Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

                     Light Falls, Green On Red Gallery, Dublin

                     Signal Failure, Pace London, London

                     Works on Paper, Greene Naftali, New York

2013            Correspondences: Ad Reinhardt at 100, TEMP Art Space, New York

                     Galerie Perrotin, Paris

2012            Anti-Establishment, BARD College, Annandale-on-Hudson

                     Ghosts before Breakfast, White Flag Projects, St. Louis, Missouri

                     I Think And That is All That I Am, Thomas Duncan Gallery, Los Angeles

                     Accrochage, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2011             Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti) visits Klosterfelde: Liz Deschenes and Scott Lyall, Klosterfelde, Berlin

                     Double Yolk: Rachel Harrison and Scott Lyall, Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp

                     Hasta Mañana, Greene Naftali Gallery, New York

                     Chopped & Screwed, MKG127, Toronto

                     Schnitte im Raum, (Rachel Harrison and Scott Lyall), Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen

                     With One Color, curated by Paul McCabe, Van de Weghe Fine Art, New York

                     Tentation d’Hazard: The Montreal Biennial (MTL BNL), Montreal, PQ

                     From New York to London: the Medium of Contingency, Thomas Dane Gallery,  London

2010            Superviscous, curated by Charles Reeves, Ontario College of Art Professional  Gallery

                     Rationalisme Appliqué, Collaboration with Blake Rayne, 1301PE, Los Angeles

                     Dan Flavin & Scott Lyall, two person show with Dan Flavin, Le Commissariat, Paris

2009           Stonescape, The Art Cave, Calistoga, California

                     Collatéral  (with Liz Deschenes, Sam Lewitt, Sean Paul, Eileen Quinlan, Blake Rayne, Nora Schultz, Cheyney Thompson), Le Confront Moderne-                            Centre pour l’Art  Contemporain, Poitiers

                     The Lining of Forgetting  (with Edgar Arseneaux, Louise Bourgeois, John Coplans, Dinh Q. Lê, Chris Marker Kerry Tribe, Rachel                                                        Whiteread), Austin Museum of Art, Texas

                     Practice vs. Object, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

                     CODE SHARE: 5 Continents, 10 Biennials, 20 artists, Contemporary Art  Center (ACA), Vilnius,

2008           Novel, Anna-Catharina Gebbers Bilbiothekswohnung, Berlin

                     The 7th SITE Santa Fe Biennial, SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico, curated by Lance Fung

                     The Lining of Forgetting, curated by Xandra Eden, Weatherspoon Museum, Greensboro, North Carolina

                     Momentum, Susan Hobbs Gallery, Toronto

2007           24 November – 22 December, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

                     Regroup Show, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

                     Scott Lyall, Maria Hassabi, Gloria, PS 122, New York

                     Scott Lyall, Maria Hassabi, Gloria, The Ballroom, Marfa,Texas

                     Massiv Analog Academy, organized by John Kelsey and Gareth James, Galerie  Christian Nagel, Cologne

                     For the People of Paris, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris (cat.)

                     Form as Memory, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2006           When Hangover Becomes Form (collaboration with Rachel Harrison), Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver

                     When Hangover Becomes Form (collaboration with Rachel Harrison), LACE, Los Angeles

                     Hands Up/Hands Down, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

                     We Can Do This Now, curated by Gregory Burke and Helena Reckett, The Power Plant, Toronto

2004           Yarns, Solomon Fine Art, Seattle

                     Scott Lyall, Roe Ethridge, Blake Rayne, Greener Pastures, Toronto

2003           Psychotopes, curated by Markus Müller, YYZ Artists Outlet, Toronto

                     Scott Lyall, Brandon Latau, Cory McCorkle, Goldman Tevis Gallery, Los Angeles

                     Mary Goldman Gallery, Los Angeles

2001            Scott Lyall/Josh Blackwell, Goldman/Tevis, Los Angeles

2000           New York Projects, curated by Luke Dowd, Delfina, London

1999            Construction Drawings, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, KunstWerke, Berlin

1998            Architecture! Architecture! Architecture!, Hunter College, Times Square Gallery, New York

                     Construction Drawings, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, P.S. 1, New York

                     e pluribus nihil, curated by Colin De Land, American Fine Arts Inc., New York

1996            Copiacabana, curated by K. Gookin/R. Kahn, Museo Estrameno, Lisbon                      

1995            ReZone, curated by Donald Carroll, Diverse Works Gallery, Houston

                     Club Berlin, Kunstshaft Site, Biennale de Venezia, Venice

1994            Scott Lyall, Blake Rayne, John Goode Gallery, New York

1993            04/30/1993, Rainforest Apartments, Hollywood, CA

                     The Los Angeles Thing, ICA, London; Glasgow College of Art, Glasgow, Scotland

                     Real, Post, Other, The Municipal Building, Los Angeles

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

2014            Bakst, Grace Lauren, Dance Interview: Scott Lyall and Maria Hassabi, BOMB Magazine, February 11

2011            Martin Herbert, “Campoli Presti nudes 3”, London Reviews Marathon, Art Review, Issue 56     

                     Aude Launay “A Certain Idea of White”, Scott Lyall, Hugo Pernet and Bertrand Planes, 02, Autumn 2011

                     Lyall, Scott. “Artist’s On Ab-Ex: Scott Lyall”, Art Forum, 2011

                     McKay, Robin. “The Medium of Contingency”, Ridinghouse Press, London, 2011

2010            Anon. Contemporary Art Daily, October 21, 2010

                     Rhodes, Richard (ed). “See it: Scott Lyall In-Between Times”, Canadian Art, April 8, 2010

2009            Adler, Dan. “Scott Lyall: Power Plant, Toronto”, Artforum, January, p.205

                      Rudd, Claire. “The Lining of Forgetting, Austin Museum of Art Review. …might be good”, Fluent Collaborative, Issue #24, June

                      Burke, Gregory/ Linsley, Robert/ Busta, Caroline/ Lyall, Scott, Scott Lyall: The Color Ball, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2009

                      Burton, Johanna. “Not a Single Point of View: Contemporary Sculpture and the   Spatial Imaginary” in State of the Art: Contemporary Sculpture,                           Yale University Art Gallery Bulletin 2009; New Haven: Yale University Art Gallery, 2009

                      Lewis, David. Critics’ Picks: “Collatéral” (review) Artforum.com, 11 August 2009

                      Matotek, Jennifer. FOCUS: Scott Lyall, SWITCH, Winter 2008/2009

                      Rees, Simon (ed). “Code Share”, The Contemporary Art Centre, Lithuania (ex.brochure).

                      Airault, Damien. “Le speculation par l’asymetrie”, Deuxieme Agence, Vol 34, August 2009.

2008            Antonova, Iliana. “Best of 2008: The color Ball, SNAP!”, December, 2008

                      Jager, David. Allusive, elusive Scott Lyall, NOW Magazine, 24 Sept- Oct, 2008

                      Carson, Andrea. VoCA suggests… viewoncanadianart.com, 29 August 2008

                      Fairfield, Doug. SITE out of luck, Santa Fe New Mexican, 31 July 2008

                      Chisholm, Christie. “Come Out and Play – Lucky Number Seven at SITE Santa Fe”. Alibi.com, V.17 No.27, July 3 – 9

                      Helfand, Greg. SITE Santa Fe takes leap of faith, ARTINFO.com, 1 July 2008

                      Fung, Lance (exhibition catalogue), Lucky Number Seven, Santa Fe, New Mexico: SITE   Sante Fe, 2008

                      Gopnik, Blake. “A site for Thinking Outside the Box”, The Washington Post, July 6, 2008

                      Milroy, Sarah. The idea of a bright tomorrow is so yesterday, The Globe and Mail, 20 Septembre 2008

                      Sandals, Leah. Dusseldorf Do, NOW Magazine, 17-24 July 2008

                      Cook, Sarah/ Eden, Xandra/ Roberts, Eden (exhibition catalogue). The Lining of Forgetting Greensboro, North Carolina: Weatherspoon Art                                   Museum, 2008

                      Lyall, Scott (essay) in Novel, Williams, Matt and Rowlands, Alun, eds. Lecture Meant to Accompany the Consumption of a Multiple.                                                   Berlin/London: Anna Catharina Gebbers Bibliothekswohnung/Hyphen Press, 2008

                      Finkel, Jori. Welcome to New Mexico. Now create. The New York Times, 27 January 2008

                      Gopnik, Blake. “Best of 2008”. The Washington Post, 2008

2007             Rhodes, Richard (ed). “Toronto Now: The Moment”, Canadian Art, Winter 2007, pp 58-59

                      Milroy, Sarah. A meeting of art, power and the city. The Globe and Mail, 10 January

                      For the People of Paris, Sutton Lane, Paris, 2007

                      Linsley, Robert, Around the Episcene, Vancouver: Old Mill Books, 2007

2006            Saltz, Jerry. All Art is Contemporary Art. Modern Painters, November 2006

                      Schmerler, Sarah. Scott Lyall, a dancer dance. Time Out New York,12-18 October 2006                 

                      Rinebold, Mary. Orchard Underground. artnet.com, 7 September 2006

                      Miles, Christopher. Part of the package: Scott Lyall and Rachel Harrison remain  true to themselves, but also accessorize each other, in their first                           collaboration, at  LACE. Los Angeles Times, 14 August 2006

                      Adler, Dan. When Hangover Becomes Form. Vancouver: Contemporary Art Gallery,2006

                      Bonham-Carter, Charlotte. “Stuck On You”. ArtReview, June, p.25.                                      

                      Goddard, Peter. “Take a walk on the Smelly Side”. The Toronto Star, April 1    

                      Hamilton, Emily Elisa. “The High Concept No Concept Art Show”. MAG, April            

                       Lacanian Ink 28, (New York: Ayretsa: November 2006), image reproduction               

                       Mahovsky, Trevor, “Rachel Harrison and Scott Lyall at the Contemporary Art Gallery”, in Artforum, May (Illustration)

                       Saltz, Jerry, “New York Journal”, in Modern Painters, November, p. 58

2004             Eden, Xandra. “Scott Lyall, Susan Hobbs Gallery”. Canadian Art, Summer, p. 92-93

                       Tevis, John, Yarns (Seattle, WA: Independent Publication) / exhibition catalogue

2002             Adler, Dan. “Scott Lyall: Susan Hobbs Gallery”. Zing Magazine, Number 177,

                       Dault, Gary Michael. “Scott Lyall at Susan Hobbs”. The Globe and Mail, January 5

                       Adler, Dan/ Lyall, Scott. Scott Lyall: Ok!lahoma. Toronto: Art Gallery of York  University, 2002

                       Hanna, Deirdre. “Random Reason”. NOW Magazine, January 3-9

2001             Milroy, Sarah. “Critics’ Choice”. The Globe and Mail, December 15

2000            Roberts, Alison. “A Brooklyn Cheer for the British Art Scene”. Evening Standard,  August 1

                      Rattameyer, Christian, “Garage hier, Landschaft da”, in Blitz Review, http://blitzreview.de (Illustration)

                      Ratman, Neru. “Gallery Controlled Diet”. The Face, August

                      Schmitz, Edgar. “New York Projects”, Kunstforum, November-December, p.48

1998             Ballengee, Brian, et al. “Mob Rule #9, Sacred Cows and Dead Horse”. NY Arts Magazine, February-March, p.6-7

                      Greene, David A. “Scott Lyall, Greene Naftali Gallery”, Frieze, Issue 39, March-April, p. 88-89

                      Millet, Catherine, ed. “Exporama”, in Art Presse, February (Illustration)

                      Pedrosa, Adriano. “Scott Lyall, Greene Naftali Gallery”. ArtForum, Summer, p.135

                      Schmerler, Sarah. “Scott Lyall”. Time Out New York, Number 122, January, p. 46

1996             Ichihuri, Kentaro, “I Am Going Around the World”, in BT Contemporary Art, June (Illustration)

                      Servertar, Stuart, “Scott Lyall, Greene Naftali Gallery”, New York Press, February 28 – March 5

1995              Edwards, Thomas. “Artists Work to Redefine their Spaces”. Houston Post, March 6

1993              Gookin, Kirby; Kahn, Robin; eds., Promotional Copy. New York, 1993

Group exhibition celebrating Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagners donation to the Whitney and Pompidou

09 Jun, 2016-15 Jul, 2016

Campoli Presti, Paris

Dragons. SLStudio.clone 1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone 1/10/1

09 Sep, 2017-26 Sep, 2017

Campoli Presti, Paris

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.

Scott Lyall

Dragons

SLStudio.clone1/2/1 – SLStudio.clone1/10/1

9 September – 26 September  

Opening 9 September

Campoli Presti, Paris

 

Press release

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce Dragons, Scott Lyall’s fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, opening on September 9th.

Dragons continues Lyall’s investigation of colour in the context of art and technological modelling. Recalling that colour is the visible spectrum of light, Lyall’s works are the result of viewing geometries: precisely drawn encounters between environmental light, the structuring of surfaces, our brain, and an eye.

Like his Black Glass (2014-2016), these geometries pertain to structural colour: colour that is immanent to a viewing geometry, and not an element applied from outside. In the Black Glass works, light is absorbed between panels of laminated museum glass. Ink infects the laminated material itself, absorbing light and colour into the structure of work.

His recent works employ Nanomedia unique engraving on foil, a manipulation of wafers of engineered foil at the level of the material’s molecular structure, to produce diffractions of environmental light. The foil is rebuilt as infinitesimal photonic structures that result in the diffracted colour. These colours are not derived from pigments or chemistry. They are not mere representations of light. They are a primary appearance of visible light as it is broken down and scattered by the texture of the foil. Lyall refers to these colours as a performance by light. Again, these textures are achieved at the Nano-scale, or at one billion pieces of information per meter.  

These works are a result of conversations between Lyall and a team of optical physicists, led by Bozema Kaminska and Hao Jiang, at their Lab at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. But the nature of the work is not exclusively scientific. For Lyall, the interest was to capture a scientific artefact—or a so-called ‘new material’—before it was decided as a fixed technology. Passing from the Lab to the frame of art, the only current function of these foils is to picture—to offer themselves to art as a pictorial support. The works have also been called philosophical prototypes: aesthetic objects offered as potential for concept development, and continued speculation in art.

The work’s scale in relation to our body requires close attention on the part of the viewer, and a willingness to inspect at an intimate range. Just like images on monitors and smart phones, the viewer has to lean in to receive these images. But because the works are non-photographable, they interrupt contemporary habits of scanning, swiping, and scrolling across screens.

The pictorial sources consist of nebulae and other cosmic bodies from the edges of our universe, namely phenomenon that are usually unseen, untouched and intangible. The largest visual scale encounters the smallest picturing units. The nebulae are colourized and altered algorithmically. This makes the colours split apart and multiply, bursting into flames and trailing into flickers. These algorithmic effects become the series of instructions (a script) to manipulate individual works, directing the etching operations in the Lab to anticipate performances environmental lights.

 

Scott Lyall lives and works in Toronto and New York. His work is part of the permanent collections of Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York. His works has been recently included in Ballistic Poetry, La Verrière – Hermès Foundation, Brussels (2016) and Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).Past exhibitions include Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London; Campoli Presti, Paris; Galerie Christian Nagel, Antwerp; the Montreal Biennial and the 7th Santa Fe Biennial.