CHRISTIAN BONNEFOI
SARAH CHARLESWORTH
LIZ DESCHENES
ROE ETHRIDGE
JUTTA KOETHER
DANIEL LEFCOURT
VALENTINA LIERNUR
JASON LOEBS
SCOTT LYALL
NICK MAUSS
CHARLES MAYTON
JOHN MILLER
OLIVIER MOSSET
SEAN PAUL
EILEEN QUINLAN
BLAKE RAYNE
CLEMENT RODZIELSKI
CHRISTOPH RUCKHÄBERLE
NORA SCHULTZ
AMY SILLMAN
REENA SPAULINGS
JOANNE TATHAM & TOM O’SULLIVAN
CHEYNEY THOMPSON

LIZ DESCHENES

Born Boston, MA, 1966
Lives and works in New York

EDUCATION

1988 Rhode Island School of Design B.F.A. Photography, Providence

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Le Centre Pompidou, Paris

MoMA – The Museum of Modern Art, New York 

The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

The Art Institute of Chicago

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C.

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on-Hudson

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

 

SOLO EXHIBITIONS 

2018 Liz Deschenes, Campoli Presti, London

2016 Liz Deschenes, Campoli Presti, Paris

Liz Deschenes, curated by Eva Respini, The Institute of Contemporary Art/ Boston

2015 Liz Deschenes: Gallery 4.1.1, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA

2014 Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis

Stereographs #1 – 4 (Rise / Fall), Miguel Abreu, New York

2013 Bracket (Paris), Campoli Presti, Paris

Bracket (London), Campoli Presti, London

2012 Secession, Vienna, Austria

2010 Shift / Rise, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Brussels

Tilt / Swing (version 2), Art|41|Basel – Art Unlimited

2009 Right / Left, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Chromatic Aberration (Red Screen, Green Screen, Blue Screen a series of Photographs from 2001 to 2008), Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

Tilt / Swing, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2008 Presentation of new works, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

2007 Photographs, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

Registration, Miguel Abreu, New York

2001 Blue Screen Process, Andrew Kreps Gallery, NYC

1999 Below Sea Level, Andrew Kreps Gallery, NYC

1997 Beppu, Bronwyn Keenan Gallery, NYC

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2018  Into the Light : Photography and Abstract Art, Tate Modern

2017 Plages, Campoli Presti, London

Looking Back / The 11th White Columns Annual – Selected by Anne Doran, White Columns, New York

Liz Deschenes and Sol Lewitt, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

2016 Liz Deschenes / Sol LeWitt, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Sol LeWitt and Liz Deschenes, Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Group Exhibition, Campoli Presti, Paris

Visibility, Campoli Presti, London

Emanations: The Art of the Cameraless Photograph, curated by Geoff Batchen, Govett-Brewster Art  Gallery, New Zealand

Poésie Balistique, Fondation d’Entreprise, Hermès, Brussels

La Boîte de Pandore: une autre histoire de la photographie par Jan Dibbets, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris

From Minimalism into Algorithm, The Kitchen, New York

In Place Of, curated by Leah Pires, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2015 Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

New Skin, curated by Massimiliano Gioni, Aïshti Foundation, Beirut, Lebanon

A Kind of Graphic Unconscious, Susan Hobbs, Toronto, Canada

The Camera’s Blind Spot II, Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerp

New Acquisitions, Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester

Bricolage: La souris et le perroquet, Villa Arson, Nice

2014 Carl Andre, Liz Deschenes, Richard Prince, R. H. Quaytman, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne Liz Deschenes / Florian Pumhösl, Galerie Buchholz, Cologne

Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions, MoMA, NEW YORK

Abandon the parents, National Gallery of Denmark, Copenhagen

Backs Grounds: Impressions Photographiques (2), Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

occupy painting, Autocenter, Berlin

What Is a Photograph?, organized by Carol Squiers, International Center of Photography, New York

2013 L’épreuve de l’abstraction, FRAC Poitou-Charentes, Médiathèque de Vouillé, France

CROSS OVER, Photography of Science + Science of Photography Fotomuseum Winterthur, Switzerland

XL: 19 New Acquisitions in Photography, Museum of Modern Art, New York

Alchemical, Steven Kasher Gallery, New York

Lens Drawings, curated by Jens Hoffmann, Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris

Ambient, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York

The Black Mirror, curated by James Welling and Diane Rosenstein, Diane Rosenstein Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA

The Unphotographable, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco

2012 For the Martian Chronicles, L&M Arts,Venice

Liz Deschenes and Charlotte Posenenske, Melas Papadopoulos Gallery, Athens

Whitney Biennial 2012, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Parcours, with Florian Pumhösl, The Art Institute of Chicago, IL

Carl Stüwe in the context of Contemporary Photography- with Liz Deschenes, Jan Paul Evers and Jochen Lempert, Bielefeld Kunstverein, Bielefeld

Notations: The Cage Effect Today, Hunter College / Times Square Gallery, New York

Carl Strüwe in the context of Contemporary Photography, Bielefelder Kunstverein, Germany

accrochage, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

2011 Sutton Lane visits Klosterfelde: Liz Deschenes and Scott Lyall, Klosterfelde, Berlin

After Images, Jewish Museum of Belgium, Brussels

The Anxiety of Photography, Aspen Art Museum

New York to London and back-The Medium of Contingency, Thomas Dane Gallery, London

Systemsanalyse, Langen Foundation, Germany2010

Systems Analysis, westlondonprojects, London

How soon is now, selected by Tom Eccles, Liam Gillick, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Philippe Parreno and Beatrix Ruf, Garage, Moscow

Free, curated by Lauren Cornell, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York

A Shot in the Dark, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis 

Les rencontres d’Arles 2010 / Edition 41, Arles, France

False/Divide, Miguel Abreu, New York

Picture Industry (Goodbye To All That), organized by Walead Beshty, Regen Projects, Los Angeles

ITEM, Mitchell Innis & Nash, New York

De Rigueur, Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles

Photogenic, Blanket Contemporary Art, Vancouver, British Columbia

Blind Mirror, Galleria Raucci/Santamaria, Naples

2009 Infinitesimal Eternity, Yale University School of Art, New Have

SEQUENCE 2: One or two works, one week, (with Olivier Mosset, Hans Bellmer and R.H Quaytman), Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Colour Chart: Reinventing Colour, 1950 to Today, Tate Liverpool

Art|40|Basel, Art Premiere with R. H. Quaytman

Collateral, Group exhibition with Sam Lewitt, Scott Lyall, Sean Paul, Eileen Quinlan, Blake Rayne, Nora Schultz, Cheyney Thompson, Le Confort Moderne – Centre pour l’art contemporain, Poitiers

Der Schnitt durch die Oberflache legt neue Oberflachen frei, (The Cut Through the Surfaces Reveals New Surfaces), curated by Max Mayer and Hans-Jurgen Hafner, Temporary Gallery, Cologne

FAX, The Drawing Center, New York

Modern Wing Inaugural Installation of Contemporary Photograph, curated by Matthew Witkovski, The Art Institute of Chicago

La Vie mode d’emploi: Carl Andre, Martin Barre, Daniel Buren, Liz Deschenes, Sherrie Levine, Cheyney Thompson, Franz West, curated by David Lewis, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Constructivismes!, curated by Olivier Renaud-Clement, Galerie Almine Rech, Brussels

Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin

To Be Determined, Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

Practice vs Object, organized by Margaret Liu Clinton, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Twilight, Harris Lieberman, New York

Photography in the Abstract, organised by Maureen Mahoney, Lora Reynolds Gallery, Texas2008

Le Retour: Mark Amm, Walead Beshty, Liz Deschenes, Nathan Hylden, Nice & Fit, Berlin

Photography on Photography: Reflections on the Medium since 1960, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Color Chart, Museum of Modern Art, New York

Standard Sizes, curated by Joao Ribas, Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

The Man Whose Shoes Squeaked, Richard Telles Gallery, Los Angeles

2007 Regroup Show, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

24 November – 22 December, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti)- Paris

Stuff: International Contemporary Art from the Collection of Burt Aaron, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, Detroit

For the People of Paris, Sutton Lane c/o Ghislaine Hussenot, Paris

Strange Magic, Luhring Augustine, New York

Form As Memory, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York, NY

2006 Bunch Alliance and Dissolve, The Contemporary Art Center, Cincinnati

Vija Celmins,Liz Deschenes, Zoe Leonard, Tracy Williams, Ltd. NY

2005 The Photograph in Question, Von Lintel Gallery, NY

2004 Liz Deschenes/ Siobhan Liddell, Gesellschaft fur Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen 

2003 Rethinking Photography V, curated by Ruth Horak, The Forum Stadtpark, Graz 

In Full View, Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

Afternoon Delight, curated by Max Henry, Caren Golden Fine Art, New York

Back Grounds, curated by Olivier Renaud-Clement, Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

2002 Back Grounds, curated by Olivier Renaud-Clement, Galerie Nelson, Paris

Modern Photographs from the Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Overnight to many Cities, Photographer’s Gallery, London

State of the Gallery, Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

2001 Salon Style, Plus Ultra, Brooklyn New York

[Some] Photography [Abstract], Larry Becker Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Overnight to Many Cities, curated by Collier Schorr, 303 Gallery, New York

In the landscape, Silverstein Gallery, New York

Rocks and Trees, curated by David Armstrong, Photographic Resource Center, Boston

Serial Number, Gale Gates, curated by Lauren Ross, Brooklyn, New York

Hydro, Marcel Sitcoske Gallery, curated by Erin Parrish, San Francisco, California

Sea Change: The Seascape in Contemporary Photography, Museum of Photographic Arts, San Diego, California, and International Center of Photography, New York

The Cathedral Project: Liz Deschenes, Kevin Larman, Donald Moffett, curated by Katherine Gass, The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, New York

1998 Sea Change: The Seascape in Contemporary Photography, curated by Trudy Wilner Stack (catalogue), Center for Creative Photography Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona

Tenri Bienale 1998 (catalogue), Doyusha Gallery, Tokyo; Osaka Municipal Museum of Art, Osaka; Hokutopia, Tokyo; Niigata Prefectural Civic Centre, Niigata; Fukuoka Prefectural Museum of Art, Fukuoka; and Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art, Aichi, Japan

1996 Water, James Graham & sons, New York

Liz Deschenes, Drew Dominick, Susan Silas, Jose Freire Gallery, New York

1991 Outrageous Desire, Rutgers University, Mason Gross School of the Arts, DAB Galleries, New Brunswick, New Jersey

 

GRANTS AND AWARDS

2014 Rappaport Prize, deCordova Scuplture Park and Museum

2004 Anonymous was a Woman Foundation

2000 Aaron Siskind Foundation Grant

 

CURATION

2015 «Artist’s Choice: An Expanded Filed of Photography», MASS MoCA, North Adams

2000 «Photography About Photography», Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

 

TEACHING

2006 – present Bennington College, Faculty, Bennington

2004 – present Visiting Artist, Columbia University, New York

2008 – 2010 Yale University, Visiting Artist, MFA Painting and Printmaking Department, New Haven

2003 – 2010 Adjunct Professor, School of Visual Arts, MFA Photography and Related Media Department, New York

2006 – 2007 Visiting Professor, Bard College, Annadale-on-Hudson, New York

2006 Milton Avery School Of The Arts, Bard College

2000 – 2006 Instructor, International Center of Photography, New York

 

LECTURES/VISITING ARTIST

2015 Lecture on «Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld», New Museum, New York

2014 Symposium «Reconsidering the object: Researching interwar Photography in the Digital Age», Museum of Modern Art, New York

Rappaport Prize Lecture, Massachusetts Colege of Art and Design, Boston

«Photography is ____________», Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago

Simmons, Sara VanDerBeek, Liz Deschenes, and Kate Linker, Art Institute of Chicago

2012 Artist talk with Florian Pumhösl, Secession, Vienna, Austria

«Abstraction in Photography», MoMA’s Forum on Contemporary Photography

Artists in Conversation: Parcours, Art Institute of Chicago

Art Talks Series, The Art Institute of Boston at Lesley University, Boston

2009 Chicago Humanities Festival & Art Institute of Chicago: Photography Discussion with Gaylen Gerber and Matt Witkovsky, Chicago

2007 College Art Association, NYC, Photography, Panel discussion (Stephen Pinson, Andres Zervigon, Douglas Crimp, Natasha Egan, Douglas Nicked, and Scott Rothkopf)

UCLA, Master of Fine Arts, artist lecture and critiques

2006 «Photography as Object», Panel discussion at Andrew Kreps Gallery, NY (Matt Keegan, Arthur Ou, Shannon Ebner, James Welling, and Kelly Walker)

MICA, Lecture, and visiting artist critiques

Ohio University, Lecture, and visiting artist critiques

Bennington College, Lecture, and visiting artist critiques

2004 Columbia University lecture, and visiting artist

The International Center of Photography visiting artist lecture

2002 International Studio Program, NYC

City College, NYC

New York University, NYC

School of Visual Arts, NYC

2001 International Center of Photography, NYC

2000 International Center of Photography, NYC

Columbia University, NYC, Visiting Artist Lecture, Photography Department

1998 Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, Panel Discussion “Sea Change”

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Periodicals

2016 Sanchez, Gabriel H. “Liz Deschenes”, Artforum, 25 July

Baumgardner, Julie « Photo Finish: Liz Deschenes’ Conceptual Images Take Over The ICA In Boston », Wallpaper, 1 July

Di Benedetto, Gabrielle « ICA Debuts New Exhibit by Nalini Malani and Liz Deschenes, Boston Magazine, 30 June

2015 Williams, Jonathan Bruce. “Liz Deschenes”, The third Rail, Issue 5

Hatt, Etienne. “Paradoxical Abstraction”, Art Press, March

“Liz Deschenes at the Walker Art Center”, Aperture, January 21

2014 Ballard, Thea. “How to light a Show: Liz Deschenes Turns the Gallery Into a Camera”, Modern Painters, December Dash, N. “N. Dash on Liz Deschenes”, Art in America, August

Johnson, Ken. “Words That Do More Than Signify,” Art in Review, The New York Times, July 3

“Liz Deschenes,” Goings on About Town, The New Yorker, June 9-16

Schwendener, Martha “Liz Deschenes: Stereographs #1-4 (Rise/Fall),” Art in Review, The New York Times, May 16

“Liz Deschenes, ‘Stereographs #1-4’,” Time Out New York, May 15-21

Marcoci, Roxana. “Radical Looking: In the Presence of the Image, In the Absence of the Spectacle,” Mousse, No. 43

Pollack, Maika. “’What is a Photograph?’ at the International Centerof Photography,”GalleristNY.com, February 12

Ollman, Leah. “In a digital world, New York show wonders ‘What Is a Photograph’,”Los Angeles Times, February 22

Rexer, Lyle. “A New Exhibition Asks, What Is a Photograph, Anyway?,” LightBox.Time.com, January 30

Charlesworth, JJ. “Liz Deschenes Bracket London”, ArtReview, January & February

Applin, Jo. “Liz Deschenes Campoli Presti” Review, Artforum, January

2013 Mary, Rinebold, « Best of 2013 », Artforum, December

Epstein, Nicolas. Photomonitor, review, December

Allison, Genevieve. “Critics’ Picks: ‘Ambient’”, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, Artforum.com, July

Císâr, Karel. “Introduction: Photography After Recession”, Fotograf, Issue 21

Beshty, Walead.Ed., Blind Spot, Issue 46

O’Neill-Butler, Laura. “Seceding: A Conversation with Liz Deschenes”, The Paris Review, January 22

2012 Kasten, Barbara. “Best of 2012, The Artists’ Artist: Parcours,” Artforum, December

Bailey, Stephanie.“Critics’ Picks: Charlotte Posenenske and Liz Deschenes,” Artforum, November

Liz, Deschenes. “Media Study”, Artforum, September

Gallun, Lucy. “Surface and Light: Liz Deschenes”, Inside/Out: a MoMA / PS1 Blog, July 12

Tutter, Adele. “Finding Art in Empty Space: Responses to John Cage”, artcritical, April 19

Battista, Kathy. “Whitney Biennial,” Art Monthly, April

Baker, Kenneth. “The Whitney: 2012 Biennial,” San Francisco Chronicle, April 1

Peterson, Kathleen. “Liz Deschenes,” BOMB, No. 119 Spring

Sholis, Brian. “In the Studio: Liz Deschenes,” Art in America, March

Viveros-Faune, Christian, “The Whitney Biennial 2012 – Caution: Dead End,” The Village Voice, March 7

“Goings on About Town: Art,” The New Yorker, March 5 – 11

McGarry, Kevin. “Out There, Live From the Whitney Biennial,” T Magazine Blog, March 2

Esplund, Lance. “Killer, Security Guard Enliven Whitney Biennial: Lance Esplund,” Bloomberg, March 1

Pollack, Maika. “Be Here Now: Eccentric Historicism Emerges at the 2012 Whitney Biennial,” Gallerist NY, Feb. 28 2011

2011 Whiley, Chris. “Depth of Focus,” Frieze, November

Kröner, Magdalena. “Form, Fragment, Formation. Aktuelle Tendenzen der Abstrakten Fotografie,”Kunstforum International, Jan/Feb

2010 Smith, Roberta. “The Varieties of Abstract Experience,” The New York Times, August 6

Witkovsky, Matthew. “Another History,” Artforum, March

Greenberger Rafferty, Sara. “Chemical Dependence Liz Deschenes,” Fantom, Winter 2010

Witkovski, Matthew,“Another History,”Artforum, March

2009 Bedford, Christopher,“Depth of Field,”Frieze, SeptemberLaunay, Aude,“Liz Deschenes, Rebecca Quaytman, Meredyth Sparks,”Zero Deux, Issue 52, Winter 2009/2010

Rosenberg, Karen,“Liz Deschenes, Tilt/Swing,”The New York Times, May 29

Doran, Anne,“Liz Deschenes, Tilt/Swing,”Time Out New York, Issue 712, May 21-27

2008 Walleston, Aimee,“Sight Specificity,”Tokion, September

Gardner, James,“Message in the Medium,”The New York Sun, April 17

Ross, Lauren,“Review,”Art in America, January

2007 “Strange Magic,” (Review) The New Yorker, July 23

Faconti, Dana, (ed), Blind Spot, Issue 36, Fall/Winter

Rosenberg, Karen, “An Afternoon in Chelsea,” New York Magazine, July 23

Smith, Roberta, “Strange Magic,” The New York Times, July

Burton, Joanna, “Liz Deschenes,” Artforum, SummerSholis, Brian, “Liz Deschenes,” Artforum.com, May

Smith, Roberta, “Liz Deschenes, Registration,” The New York Times, May

O’Neill Butler, Lauren, “Liz Deschenes,” Time Out, New York, May

Orden, Abraham, “The Minute,” Artnet, May“Liz Deschenes”, The New Yorker, May

McAdams, Shane, “Liz Deschenes, Registration,” The Brooklyn Rail, May

2006 “Vija Celmins, Liz Deschenes, Zoe Leonard,” The New Yorker, July

2005 “The Photograph in Question,” The New Yorker, July

2004 Robillard-Krivda, Eva, “Back Grounds. Impressions photographiques,» paris-art.com, March

2003 Wilson, Michael. “New York Critics Pick; Back Grounds: Impressions Photographiques,” Artforum, March

2002 “Liz Deschenes, Page 382,” Charley

2001 Williams, Gregory. “Flux Interior,” Interior Design, August

Smith, Roberta. “Quick as a Shutter, Group Shows Shatter Conventional Wisdom,” New York Times, July 6

Sundell, Margaret. “Liz Deschenes,” Artforum, May

Valdez, Sarah.“Serial Number,” Time Out New York, February 8 – 15

2000 Aletti, Vince, “Photography About Photography,” The Village Voice, March 7

Henry, Max. artnet.com, February

Paul Myoda, Flash Art, Nov/Dec, Issue No. 209 .

Arning, Bill, Time Out New York, August 5-12, Issue No. 202.1999

Aletti, Vince, The Village Voice, July 20

Cotter, Holland, The New York Times, July 16

Neal, Alex, Time Out New York, June 10-17, Issue No. 193.1998

Brennan, Michael, Artnet, February 13

Zing Magazine, “Bath Houses,” Volume 2, Winter(photography project).1997

Glueck, Grace, The New York Times, November 7

 

Catalogues

2016 Respini, Eva. Liz Deschenes, The Institute of Contemporary Art/ Boston, DelMonico Books, Prestel Munich/ London/New York

2015 Michaels, Walter Benn. The Beauty of a Social Problem. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago

2013 Muller, Christin. Cross Over. Photography of Science + Science of Photography. Spector, Leipzig

Spörr, Bettina, ed. Liz Deschenes, Secession, Vienna

2012 Griffin, Tim, ed. “How Soon Is Now?“, Luma Foundation

2011 “After Images”, Musée Juif de Belgique, Brussels

Mackay, Robin, ed. “The Medium of Contingency”, published by Urbanomic and Ridinghouse.

“Systems Analysis”, Langen Foundation, Neuss

“The Anxiety of Photography”, Aspen Art Museum

2010 Chevalier, Yann. “Collatéral”, Le Confort Moderne

2009 Cotton, Charlotte. “The Photograph as Contemporary Art”, Thames & Hudson, London

Temkin, Ann. “Colour Chart: Reinventing Colour, 1950 to Today ”, Tate Liverpool, The Museum of Modern Art, New York

2007 “For the People of Paris”, Sutton Lane – Paris

2005 Jaeger, Gottried, “Concrete Photography”, Bielefeld, Germany

2003 Horak, Ruth. “Rethinking Photography l+11”, The Forum Stadtpark, Graz, Austria

2002 Hostetler, Sue. Oceans, Rizzoli International Publications, Inc., New York

Maurizio Cattelan, Bettina Funcke, Massimiliano Gioni, Ali Subotnick, “Charley O1”, Les Presses Du Réel

Schorr, Collier. “Overnight to Many Cities: Tourism and Travel at Home and Away.”

«Great 41», The Photographers Gallery, London

1998 Stack, Trudy Wilner, Sea Change: The Seascape in Contemporary Photography, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

1991 Salo, Marcia, Outrageous Desire, Rutgers University, Mason Gross School of the Arts DAB Galleries, New Brunswick, New Jersey

Art Basel Art Unlimited with Liz Deschenes

15 Jun, 2017-18 Jun, 2017

Basel, Switzerland

Plages

16 Feb, 2017-18 Mar, 2017

Campoli Presti, London

Plages

Monika Baer
Marc Camille Chaimowicz
Sarah Charlesworth
Isabelle Cornaro
Liz Deschenes
Willem de Rooij
Nathalie du Pasquier
Louise Lawler
Nick Mauss
Marisa Merz
Amy Sillman
Cheyney Thompson

17 February – 18 March
Campoli Presti, London

2 February – 4 March
Campoli Presti, Paris

Plages brings together artists that meditate on the place of the subject inthe marking of aspace.The works exploredifferent vision instruments through which we approach everyday objects, and therefore our distance towards them, as well as the opposition between private space and exhibition space throughpremeditated patterns that discuss the idea of functionality.Besidesits usual translation asbeach, the French termPlageisabroadnotionthatindicatesthe perimeter of a space, a time lapse or the latitude between two elements -in this casepublic/private,home/business, decorative/functional.

By pointing out the history of object production and everyday material culture, artistssuch as Sarah Charlesworth, Monika Baer, Nathalie du Pasquier, Amy Sillman, Louise Lawler, Marisa Merz and Isabelle Cornaro reframe overlooked, ordinary objects and question their purpose as consumption, design, or admiration while settinga new distance between subject and object, foreground and background, as in the site-specific, reflective work of Liz Deschenes. The displacement of domestic objects often takesthe form of a renewed artistic appropriation.

The continuity between adomestic space and the exhibition space can also be addressed through the emancipation of design from taste limitations and functional demands. By radicalizing design-based techniques, the work of artists like Nick Mauss, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, and Willem de Rooij can channel multiple painting traditions and reveal collaborative processes. Cheyney Thompson’sinterpretation and intentional distortion of reproductive techniques can take the shape of repetitive patterns that delineate the exhibition area ina suite of canvases.

For further information or images please contact cora@campolipresti.com

Selected by Liz Deschenes

19 Oct, 2016-13 Jan, 2017

Press Release

Sarah Charlesworth
Selected by Liz Deschenes
6 rue de Braque

Liz Deschenes
4 rue de Braque, 3rd floor

Campoli Presti is pleased to present the first solo exhibition of works by Sarah Charlesworth at the gallery. Selected by Liz Deschenes, the works are displayed in the ground floor of 6 rue de Braque. Liz Deschenes will present a photographic installation in the newly added gallery space at 4 rue de Braque.

Charlesworth’s influential body of work deconstructed the conventions of photography and established the medium’s centrality in our perception of the world. Like contemporaries Laurie Simmons, Cindy Sherman, Jack Goldstein, Barbara Kruger, and Richard Prince, Charlesworth was later associated with the heterogeneous group of conceptual artists identified as Pictures Generation. Charlesworth stages volatile worlds, isolating objects on monochrome backgrounds to reveal the constructed nature of visual culture and question systems of image distribution.

For the exhibition at Campoli Presti, Liz Deschenes has selected works from Charlesworth’s 0+1 series. Single objects that count as visual fetishes (an altar, a skull) are surrendered to gravity and are exposed to a vaporous light that makes them simultaneously appear and recede. Their fragile existence responds to the uncertain economy of images, which can either accelerate their reproduction or make them disappear over time. Rendered in polished lacquer wooden frames, each object is meticulously staged, contributing to the theatricality of their presentation.

These photographs revisit many of the iconic images that Sarah Charlesworth worked with in her Objects of Desire series throughout the 1980’s, in which the objects were isolated on single-coloured backgrounds. Rather than cutting out and pasting onto vibrant tones, the photographs in 0+1 are made by arranging still-lifes of white objects on white backgrounds in the studio, sometimes obscuring the images further through selective focus or by placing veils between the camera and object. Connecting the artist’s early and late career work, this series is pivotal as it establishes the visual syntax that defines Charlesworth’s production.

Similarly exploring the potential of photography besides its document form, Liz Deschenes produces unique, site-specific work that reflects on the medium in expansive terms. Liz Deschenes’ work has been increasingly concerned with the interaction between the history of a site, its possibilities of display and the viewer’s awareness of his or her own perceptual and physical experience in the space.

For her presentation at Campoli Presti, Liz Deschenes will make an intervention in the new gallery space at 4 rue de Braque with a photographic installation. The geometrical shape and angled frame of the silvertoned photograms mark the space in different segments and open up new reading directions, both of the artwork and the architecture that surrounds it. Freestanding paneled works from this series have first been presented at the Walker Art Center in 2014, where Deschenes’ works echoed different architectural features of the Walker’s 1971 building, especially the stairs that take visitors from one gallery to the building’s outdoor terraces. For Deschenes’ year-long installation at MassMOCA in 2015, translucent acrylic panels made the elements relate to one another and multiply angles of view.

Sarah Charlesworth was born in 1947 in East Orange, New Jersey, and passed away in 2013 in Falls Village, Connecticut. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions at a number of institutions, including a solo survey exhibition at New Museum, New York (2015) and a retrospective organized by SITE Santa Fe (1997), which traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego (1998); the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC (1998); and the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art (1999). Charlesworth’s Stills series was recently completed and presented for the first time at the Art Institute of Chicago (2014). Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including the 77th Whitney Biennial, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Shock the News, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC (2012); Signs of a Struggle: Photography in the Wake of Postmodernism, the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (2011); September 11, the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011); The Last Newspaper, the New Museum, New York (2010); The Pictures Generation, 1974–1984, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2009); and The Last Picture Show: Artists Using Photography 1960-1982, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2004). Charlesworth taught photography for many years at the School of the Visual Arts, New York; the Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; and Princeton University, NJ.

Liz Deschenes’ work is part of the permanent collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris; MoMA, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C; Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on Hudson. Deschenes has a current survey exhibition at the ICA Boston with an accompanying monograph. She recently had solo exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2014); at MASSMoCA, North Adams (2015) and at Secession, Vienna (2012-2013). Deschenes’ work is currently on view at the Centre Pompidou, Paris in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner travelling from the Whitney Museum, New York. Past exhibitions include Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions at MoMA, New York; the Whitney Biennial 2012 and Parcours at the Art Institute of Chicago with Florian Pumhösl (2013).

Solo exhibition

19 Oct, 2016-13 Jan, 2017

Campoli Presti, Paris

Sarah Charlesworth
Selected by Liz Deschenes

6 rue de Braque

Liz Deschenes
4 rue de Braque, 3rd floor

Campoli Presti is pleased to present the first solo exhibition of works by Sarah Charlesworth at the gallery. Selected by Liz Deschenes, the works are displayed in the ground floor of 6 rue de Braque. Liz Deschenes will present a photographic installation in the newly added gallery space at 4 rue de Braque.

Charlesworth’s influential body of work deconstructed the conventions of photography and established the medium’s centrality in our perception of the world. Like contemporaries Laurie Simmons, Cindy Sherman, Jack Goldstein, Barbara Kruger, and Richard Prince, Charlesworth was later associated with the heterogeneous group of conceptual artists identified as Pictures Generation. Charlesworth stages volatile worlds, isolating objects on monochrome backgrounds to reveal the constructed nature of visual culture and question systems of image distribution.

For the exhibition at Campoli Presti, Liz Deschenes has selected works from Charlesworth’s 0+1 series. Single objects that count as visual fetishes (an altar, a skull) are surrendered to gravity and are exposed to a vaporous light that makes them simultaneously appear and recede. Their fragile existence responds to the uncertain economy of images, which can either accelerate their reproduction or make them disappear over time. Rendered in polished lacquer wooden frames, each object is meticulously staged, contributing to the theatricality of their presentation.

These photographs revisit many of the iconic images that Sarah Charlesworth worked with in her Objects of Desire series throughout the 1980’s, in which the objects were isolated on single-coloured backgrounds. Rather than cutting out and pasting onto vibrant tones, the photographs in 0+1 are made by arranging still-lifes of white objects on white backgrounds in the studio, sometimes obscuring the images further through selective focus or by placing veils between the camera and object. Connecting the artist’s early and late career work, this series is pivotal as it establishes the visual syntax that defines Charlesworth’s production.

Similarly exploring the potential of photography besides its document form, Liz Deschenes produces unique, site-specific work that reflects on the medium in expansive terms. Liz Deschenes’ work has been increasingly concerned with the interaction between the history of a site, its possibilities of display and the viewer’s awareness of his or her own perceptual and physical experience in the space.

For her presentation at Campoli Presti, Liz Deschenes will make an intervention in the new gallery space at 4 rue de Braque with a photographic installation. The geometrical shape and angled frame of the silvertoned photograms mark the space in different segments and open up new reading directions, both of the artwork and the architecture that surrounds it. Freestanding paneled works from this series have first been presented at the Walker Art Center in 2014, where Deschenes’ works echoed different architectural features of the Walker’s 1971 building, especially the stairs that take visitors from one gallery to the building’s outdoor terraces. For Deschenes’ year-long installation at MassMOCA in 2015, translucent acrylic panels made the elements relate to one another and multiply angles of view.

Sarah Charlesworth was born in 1947 in East Orange, New Jersey, and passed away in 2013 in Falls Village, Connecticut. She has been the subject of solo exhibitions at a number of institutions, including a solo survey exhibition at New Museum, New York (2015) and a retrospective organized by SITE Santa Fe (1997), which traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego (1998); the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC (1998); and the Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art (1999). Charlesworth’s Stills series was recently completed and presented for the first time at the Art Institute of Chicago (2014). Her work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including the 77th Whitney Biennial, the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); Shock the News, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC (2012); Signs of a Struggle: Photography in the Wake of Postmodernism, the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (2011); September 11, the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2011); The Last Newspaper, the New Museum, New York (2010); The Pictures Generation, 1974–1984, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2009); and The Last Picture Show: Artists Using Photography 1960-1982, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2004). Charlesworth taught photography for many years at the School of the Visual Arts, New York; the Rhode Island School of Design, Providence; and Princeton University, NJ.

Liz Deschenes’ work is part of the permanent collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris; MoMA, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C; Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on Hudson. Deschenes has a current survey exhibition at the ICA Boston with an accompanying monograph. She recently had solo exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2014); at MASSMoCA, North Adams (2015) and at Secession, Vienna (2012-2013). Deschenes’ work is currently on view at the Centre Pompidou, Paris in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner travelling from the Whitney Museum, New York. Past exhibitions include Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions at MoMA, New York; the Whitney Biennial 2012 and Parcours at the Art Institute of Chicago with Florian Pumhösl (2013).

Group exhibition celebrating Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagners donation to the Whitney and Pompidou

09 Jun, 2016-15 Jul, 2016

Campoli Presti, Paris

Liz Deschenes / Jutta Koether / Daniel Lefcourt / Scott Lyall / Sean Paul / Eileen Quinlan / Blake Rayne / Reena Spaulings / Cheyney Thompson
10 June – 23 July 2016
Campoli Presti, Paris

Campoli Presti is pleased to present a group exhibition featuring works by Liz Deschenes, Jutta Koether, Daniel Lefcourt, Scott Lyall, Sean Paul, Eileen Quinlan, Blake Rayne, Reena Spaulings and Cheyney Thompson. This generation of artists, which the gallery has represented since the beginning, has markedly contributed to redefine notions on medium-specificity and artistic agency. Their work was recently included in the exhibition “Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner” at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York which has travelled to the Centre Pompidou in Paris and is currently on view.

Making use of the medium’s most elemental aspects, namely paper, light, and chemicals, Liz Deschenes has recently worked without a camera to produce reflective photograms. These are obtained by exposing sheets of photosensitive paper to the ambient light of night before fixing them with silver toner. Deschenes’ work is increasingly concerned with architectural and historical contexts of exhibition display. Spatial factors and tangible conditions of display become inscribed in the physicality of the artwork rendering the photograph as a framing-device that intends to ‘bracket’ the space and activate the viewer. The reflective surface of the new photograms on view engages the movements of the viewer and the surrounding architecture.

Jutta Koether’s practice often involves appropriations of literature and art history masters, negotiating questions of aesthetic consensus and of the social-economical networks in which artistic practice operates. Based on Helios and Phaeton by Nicolas Poussin, Koether’s work presented in the exhibition alludes to the geometrical landmark of Western Art while defining a field of play. Locked in the material structure around it, the figure is engaged in a broader movement, organising different zones of contact. By addressing the attraction between archaism and metrics, Koether’s systematic application of paint engages the viewer in a micro-contemplation, comparable to the visual experience of picking up pennies from the ground. The painting forms part of a broader series of works that explores the allegorical figure of Fortune’s wheel and the medieval goddess Fortuna, a metaphor of role of chance in time’s passage.

Throughout his career, Daniel Lefcourt has continually engaged the space between painting and technical imaging. Lefcourt’s work reflects on contemporary image production and the digital economy of images while negotiating the reality of material procedures. His production techniques use aspects of photography, computer modelling, digital fabrication, and sculptural casting. For his Plot Fill and Cast series, Lefcourt has used computer-controlled router, digital scanning and machining techniques as the basis for a play with written and visual communication and the languages of painting. His new body of work from 2016 collapses both series, exploring the space between writing, drawing and painting. Entirely mechanically produced, Untitled (Machine Painting), 2016 is based on geometric drawings that program the path of the brush. Developed from Lefcourt’s interest in digital technologies, the works push the boundaries of painting, juxtaposing the mechanical with the chance of the material.

Scott Lyall’s recent series of works research on the status of digital colour as a code that is constantly translated, transformed, and materialized; continually delaying or deferring its meaning. His printing technique extends this act of translation as it turns information directly into colour. The canvases are produced by combining ink and its erasure, in multiple passes, through a UV-based printer. These graphic assemblages of colour data – ‘non-images’ in a certain way – form visual atmospheres that shift depending on different viewpoints, inscribing within the process an actual experience of ‘colour’.

In Sean Paul’s Arrangement 15, Front/Top/Bottom/Right/Left/Back, a still life assembled from domestic products (cup, bowl, saucer, and plate) is marked with black squares of tape; the black squares function as tokens, which allow the spatial geometry of the still life to be discerned. Following standard practices of technical representation, used for example in the fields of architecture or product design, the still life is pictured from six perpendicular planes forming a box of views composed of the front, back, left, right, top and bottom angles. This plane then becomes the array, which informs the material images’ unfolding into lived space, or a domestic scene. Madame Leblanc, Rerversed, 2012 is based on the Ingres masterpiece “Madame Leblanc”. This print admits 4 different folds, therefore 8 possible configurations on the wall. It is imagined as being folded upon an idealized architectural plane. The type of fold represented above is mapped into a 90 degree convex angle of an existing space.

Eileen Quinlan explores photography’s capacity to be both record of physical facts and deceptive illusion. Employing analogue techniques in an era of digital manipulation, Quinlan creates atmospheric abstract images using the standard tricks of commercial film photography. Based entirely in the studio, Quinlan’s work uses pre-digital photography techniques—such as gels, strobes, smoke and mirrors—to create mesmerizing abstract compositions of light, colour, and texture. Her works recall the pure abstraction of Modernist painting, but are actually direct representations of the items used to create backdrops in commercial photography. The polaroid plays an important role in Quinlan’s practice, often employed as a first take when photographing the still lifes she stages in the studio.

Blake Rayne’s last series of paintings related to his interest in recording sequential streams of movement into painting, drawing a continuous wandering line throughout the picture plane. Rayne freely paints the line tracing the surface in an intuitive movement that recalls automatic writing techniques, evoking the wandering and errant traces of digital interfaces. His new body of work from 2016 further explores these concerns by collapsing line and process. For Untitled, 2016 a steel banding commonly used in the shipment of crates was utilized as a soft stencil to create a white looping line lightly dusted with aerated acrylic paint in layers of various colours. The paperclips that initially held the banding together were released to allow for expansion into the final shape of each of the line compositions, now appearing as silhouettes.

Reena Spaulings’ The Dealers (2007) and The New Dealers (2013) were portraits of gallerists based on images downloaded from Artforum.com’s ‘Scene & Herd’ and other art world-related websites depicting friends and professional colleagues that Spaulings worked with over the years. The portraits from 2013 – the second instalment of the series first shown at Kunsthalle Zürich in 2007 – featured a more recent generation of art dealers, exposing the increasing social interests that rule the art market by turning the traders into commodities themselves. Executed in active brushstrokes the portraits play with various features of expressionist figurative painting from the 80s, such as the preference for parody or working from found images. These irreverent portraits of prominent gallerists reflect Spaulings’ interest in art’s status as an exchangeable commodity, whilst addressing the specific displacements, social networks and ambiguities Reena Spaulings inhabits in her double identity of both artist and gallerist. The Complete Dealers features a rack with promotional postcards based on the paintings of both generations of dealers, on a display that evokes their rotating popularity and the visibility features of a retro marketing tool.

Cheyney Thompson’s work focuses on the technology, production and distribution of painting within the context of current abstract economy. Thompson presents us with a visual equivalency for the intangibly complex processes governing our economic systems. The works on paper on view are based on the « Drunken Walk » algorithm, an aleatory path that is used in financial theory to predict stock prices. The algorithm belongs to the study of certain seemingly random types of motion, from botanist Robert Brown’s 19th-century observations of pollen floating on water as well as mathematician Louis Bachelier’s early 20th-centry application of Brown to model fluctuations in stock markets. In this case the “random walk” taken by Thompson’s entity produced a new sequence of values, which he then mapped onto a path, akin to the path of a labyrinth.

***

Liz Deschenes’ work is part of the permanent collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris; MoMA, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C; Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on Hudson. Deschenes has an upcoming survey exhibition at the ICA Boston opening on 28th June. She recently had solo exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and at MASSMoCA, North Adams. Deschenes’ work was recently included in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner at the Whitney Museum, New York and in Sites of Reason: A Selection of Recent Acquisitions at MoMA, New York. Past exhibitions include a solo exhibition at Secession, Vienna (2012-2013); the Whitney Biennial 2012 and Parcours at the Art Institute of Chicago with Florian Pumhösl (2013).

Jutta Koether was born in Cologne in 1958. She lives and works between New York and Berlin. Her work forms part of the permanent collections of MoMA, New York; the Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris; Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles; Nationalgalerie in Berlin and Kunsthalle Bern. Koether has an upcoming survey exhibition at Brandhorst Museum, Munich in 2017. Her work was part of Painting 2.0, Expression in the Information Age at Brandhorst Museum travelling to Mumok, Vienna. Koether has had solo exhibitions at DCA – Dundee Contemporary Arts (2013); Arnolfini, Bristol (2013); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2011), Bergen Kunsthall, Norway (2008); Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland (2007) and Kölnischer Kunstverein, Cologne (2006). She was included in the Shanghai Biennial in 2014, in the Whitney Biennial in 2012 and 2006 and in the 2012 Sao Paulo Biennial.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in New York. His work forms part of the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and MOCA – Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Lefcourt’s work was recently on view at the Whitney Museum, New York in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner. His work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including MoMA P.S.1; the Sculpture Center, Long Island City; ICA Philadelphia; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Malmö Konstmuseum and Kunst-Werke Berlin. In 2013 the Dia Art Foundation commissioned a web project by the artist. He received his MFA from Columbia University and is a member of the faculty of Rhode Island School of Design.

Scott Lyall is part of the collection of the Whitney Museum, New York. Lyall’s work was recently on view at the Whitney Museum, New York as part of Collected by Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagner. Past exhibitions include The Colour Ball at The Power Plant in Toronto (solo); the little contemporaries at Sculpture Center, New York (solo); When Hangover Becomes Form (with Rachel Harrison), Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; Anti-Establishment, curated by Johanna Burton, at the CCS Bard Hessel Museum; Schnitte im Raum, Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen; Tentation d’Hazard, The Montreal Biennial 2011; Collatéral, Le Confort Moderne, Poitiers; The Lining of Forgetting, Austin Museum of Art, Weatherspoon Art Museum; and SITE Santa Fe, 7th International Biennial 2008.

Sean Paul (b. 1978 in Salt Lake City, Utah) lives and works in New York. He received a MFA from Columbia University, NY. Past solo exhibitions include Communication in the Presence of Noise and Service Relations, Thomas Duncan Gallery, Los Angeles; A Moveable Feast, Part II, Campoli Presti, Paris; and Every Hair of the Bear, Front Desk Apparatus, New York and Symposium, Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London. Recent group exhibitions include Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Blueprints, Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY and Collatéral, Le Confort Moderne, Centre pour l’Art Contemporain, Poitiers.

Eileen Quinlan lives and works in New York. Her work is included in public collections such as MoMA, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; and FRAC (Fonds Regional d’Art Contemporain), France. Her work was recently shown at the Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens and presented at Bergen Kunsthall, Norway in 2015. It formed part of Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner at Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015/16) and New Photography 2013, curated by Roxana Marcoci at MoMA, New York. Quinlan had a two-person exhibition at The Kitchen, New York in 2012 and a solo exhibition at the ICA in Boston in 2009.

Blake Rayne lives and works in New York. His work is included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and Fonds Regional d’Art Contemporain, France (FRAC). His upcoming survey solo exhibition at the Blaffer Art Museum de Houston, Texas will open in October 2016. His work recently was on view at the Whitney Museum, New York in Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner. Past exhibitions include Künstlerhaus Graz, Austria (2013), Langen Foundation, Germany (2011), Kunsthalle Bergen (2010), The Kitchen, New York (2010) and Le Confort Moderne, Poitiers (2009).

Cheyney Thompson has had solo exhibitions at the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts (with an accompanying monograph), and the Kunstverein Braunschweig, Germany; and his work was included in the 2008 Whitney Biennial. Group shows include: Une Histoire, Centre Pompidou, Paris, Chat Jet – Painting ‘Beyond’ The Medium at Künstlerhaus Graz; The Indiscipline of Painting, Tate St. Ives; Systems Analysis at West London Projects and Langen Foundation, Germany; Greater New York at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center and The Venice Biennale, Italy in 2003.

For more information or images please contact Ines Dahn ines@campolipresti.com

Visibility curated by John Miller

31 May, 2016-16 Jul, 2016

Campoli Presti, London

no images were found

Visibility
curated by John Miller

With Lutz Bacher, Liz Deschenes, Dan Graham, Jon Kessler, Josiah McElheny, R.H. Quaytman, Aura Rosenberg and Union Gaucha Productions with Fabio Kacero.

31 May – 16 July 2016
Campoli Presti, London

Visibility, for the purposes of this particular exhibition, concerns not just visual data but also the recognition of that information as well. This awareness includes both an object of attention and the background against which it appears. Objects that blend into the background, however, are sometimes said to be “invisible.” Artworks all inevitably represent objects in some way. Accordingly, the primary purpose of an artwork, even the nonobjective artwork, is to establish a subject/object relationship. In this way, even what are ordinarily called “formal concerns” are freighted with ideological and political values.

The artists featured here not only point to objects, but also to the frameworks – or apparatuses – through which we recognize them. Josiah McElheny offers a barely visible, yet site specific wall drawing that registers a bank of windows within the gallery itself. Here, instead of windowpanes, the viewer confronts the wall. In contrast, Jon Kessler’s wall sculpture, Swan, aggressively montages a cut-up portrait of a young woman into a live video feed of the exhibition space – or wherever the work happens to be installed. Three photographs from Aura Rosenberg’s Berliner Kindheit series (based on Walter Benjamin’s memoir) survey various visual apparatuses: a rain spattered window, a Kaiserpanorama (a stereoscopic, precursor to cinema) and an opthamologist’s machine for examining eyes. In contrast, Liz Deschenes produced her triangular photogram (based on Herbert Bayer’s drawings of fields of vision) without the aid of a camera. Totloop, (i.e., “death loop”) a short film by Fabio Kacero and Union Gaucha Productions, seemingly inserts a corpse into public space, a figure that the public adamantly pretends not to see. Among other things, this recalls the corpse that refused to stay buried in Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Trouble with Harry.” Rebecca Quaytman’s lacquered black monochrome panel ostensibly declares that there is nothing to see… until one’s own reflection becomes evident. Within a similarly dark register, Lutz Bacher’s Edward depicts the “Twilight” star Robert Pattinson barely emerging from an all-engulfing, inky background. Dan Graham’s pavilions typically cast the viewer as the work’s subject and object. Here, Graham’s model for one such pavilion creates a stage from which viewers might regard themselves and others.

Taken together, these various works suggest a self-reflexive inextricability between seer, seen and the medium through which something may become visible. Moreover, they situate this relationship within a social field, by which it qualifies as a practice.

– John Miller

A Moveable Feast – Part III

24 Oct, 2013-09 Nov, 2013

Campoli Presti, Paris

A Moveable Feast – Part III
Liz Deschenes
Bracket (Paris)
24 October – 9 November 2013
Campoli Presti, Paris

The third installment of A Moveable Feast is dedicated to photographer Liz Deschenes. This presentation operates within the framework of the artist’s parallel exhibitions Bracket (London) and Bracket (Paris).

With a group of four photograms that take in to account the proportions, axis and aesthetics of the exhibition space, Deschenes reconfigures the Stereographs earlier shown at Secession, Vienna for 6 Rue de Braque. These works draw on the relationship between exhibition modes of display, architecture and photography’s own history and processes.

This body of work refers to stereography, a historical image production technique in which two pictures of the same motif, taken from slightly different angles, create photographs with a three-dimensional effect. Yet Deschenes’ “stereo graphic” way of working, as Johanna Burton states in her essay in the Secession catalogue, does not relate to an image but rather to an experience. That is, the experience of witnessing a work that continues to develop, either as a result of their chemical composition (the works oxidise and change within time), their mirror-like surface, which reflects the environment around them as well as their viewers, the work’s positioning, generating a narrative across the space.

Informed by early experimental processes around the production of unique images, the works in Bracket (London) and Bracket (Paris) explore the hidden similarities between photography pioneers Louis- Jacques-Mandé Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot. The narrow, elongated photograms presented in Paris are joined together at an angle, forming a fold that alludes to the bellows of a large-format camera.

Deschenes has also alluded to the visual connection between the works, the space, and the camera (which also means room in latin) in the photograms made for Whitney Biennial in 2012. As in Bracket (London), the photograms presented in Paris work as a framing device, a structural element of the space that engages the viewer while showing photography’s inherent contingency.

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. Deschenes’ work will be the subject of a solo exhibition at the Walker Art Center in October 2014. Recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition at Secession, Vienna; the Whitney Biennial 2012 and Parcours at the Art Institute of Chicago with Florian Pumhösl. Her work is part of the permanent collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris; MoMA, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C; Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on Hudson. Deschenes teaches at Bennington College, Vermont and is a Visiting Artist at Columbia University, New York.

Bracket (London)

14 Oct, 2013-14 Dec, 2013

Campoli Presti, London

Liz Deschenes
Bracket (London)
14 October – 14 December 2013
Campoli Presti, London

In his 1931 “Short History of Photography” Walter Benjamin refers to the French physicist and astronomer François Arago’s speech of 1839 on Daguerre’s invention of photography. Arago’s address, to the French chamber of deputies, recognized the breadth of the new medium – challenging the limited scope often bestowed on it.

The broadening of the photographic discourse is at the core of Liz Deschenes’ artistic practice. Since the early 1990s she has produced photographic work that explores the material condition of the medium and its processes. Deschenes’ work sets up a correlation between the photograph-as-object and the environmental conditions it operates in, and is increasingly concerned with architectural and historical contexts of exhibition display. Spatial factors and tangible conditions of display become inscribed in the physicality of the artwork rendering the photograph as a framing-device that intends to ‘bracket’ the space and activate the viewer.

Bracket (London), Deschenes fifth solo exhibition with the gallery, yields the output of early photography pioneers Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot as its subtext with a new series of photograms. In the late 1830s both Daguerre and Talbot had developed means to permanently capture the images they saw in a camera obscura by using light and chemistry. The daguerreotype is a unique image on a polished, silver-plated, iodine-treated sheet of copper that is developed with mercury and fixed with salt water. Talbot’s first camera pictures used fine paper coated with silver nitrate and fixed with a salt solution. Both inventors initially produced unique photographs that prominently featured still lives and studio interiors.

The exhibition addresses these similarities of the French and Anglo perspectives in lieu of their differences by physical and geographical measures. Deschenes collapses the two approaches into multi perspectival, sculptural works questioning established ways of interpreting the inventions and histories of photography. The exhibition’s second part Bracket (Paris) will present a reconfiguration of the Stereographs earlier shown at Secession, Vienna thus temporally and spatially building “a narrative across and between places”. 1

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. Deschenes’ work will be the subject of a solo exhibition at the Walker Art Center in October 2014. Recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition at Secession, Vienna; the Whitney Biennial 2012 and Parcours at the Art Institute of Chicago with Florian Pumhösl. Her work is part of the permanent collections of Centre Pompidou, Paris; MoMA, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; The Art Institute of Chicago; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C; Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on Hudson. Deschenes teaches at Bennington College, Vermont and is a Visiting Artist at Columbia University, New York.

1 Johanna Burton, Because There is No Decisive Moment, Secession catalogue, p.18.

Sutton Lane Visits Klosterfelde

15 Jul, 2011-03 Sep, 2011

Klosterfelde, Berlin

no images were found

Sutton Lane Visits Klosterfelde
Liz Deschenes / Scott Lyall
15 July – 3 September 2011
Klosterfelde, Berlin

Sutton Lane is pleased to present a two person exhibition by Liz Deschenes and Scott Lyall as part of a gallery exchange with Klosterfelde.

On view are three photograms by Liz Deschenes and four paintings by Scott Lyall from the nude series along with an adhesive vinyl.

Deschenes uses the exploration of photographic processes as a tool to investigate photography itself, the way the medium has been positioned and historicized as well as its relationship to other practices. The language and mechanisms of photography are self-consciously referenced and activate questions of representation and modes of seeing. The black photograms are camera less, reflective photographs which are the result of exposing photosensitive paper to light. Conceived as corner pieces they activate the surrounding architecture, functioning as a brace for the space and the other works in the exhibition.

The works by Scott Lyall are unique printouts in which pale colours derive from mathematical interpolations. The image which is composited to run continuously across the support is made up of digital files containing thousands of different colours. These works suggest a penumbral, shimmering light, and appear to be -indeed- nude, but they are actually the result of successive layers of colour applied to canvas or vinyl. In the case of the vinyl adhesives, only a sale or a curatorial request calls a new work into being. In this sense, this series of works highlights the contemporary economy of speculative value.

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. Her work is part of the permanent collections of The Walker Art Center; The Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum, New York; the Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C.; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on- Hudson.

Scott Lyall works in both New York and Toronto. He recently had a solo exhibition at the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto. Past group exhibitions include PS122 (New York), The SculptureCenter (New York), and the Contemporary Art Gallery (Vancouver).

Sutton Lane will present new works by both artists at abc – art berlin contemporary this September.

De America

06 May, 2011-15 Jul, 2011

Indipendenza Studio, Rome

Art Basel Miami Beach: Art Nova

02 Dec, 2010-05 Dec, 2010

Miami Beach

no images were found

Shift / Rise

12 Nov, 2010-18 Dec, 2010

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Brussels

Liz Deschenes
Shift / Rise
12 November – 18 December 2010
Sutton Lane, Brussels

Sutton Lane is pleased to present Shift / Rise, the fourth exhibition of Liz Deschenes at the gallery and her first solo exhibition in Brussels. On view are photograms – camera less, reflective photographs and photographs from the Gamma series.

Shift and Rise are terms used to describe camera movements that are available with large format view cameras. Rise is a vertical movement up along the lens plane which is important in architectural photography. It allows photographing tall structures such as buildings and trees while eliminating converging parallels which would make them look like they are falling over. Shift is a horizontal movement of the front standard, left or right from its normal position. It is used to photograph a reflective surface without the camera appearing in the field.

In Liz Deschenes’ exhibition the movements of the camera suggested by the title are replaced with the movements of the viewer whose body engages with the reflective surfaces of the exhibited photograms. It is the surrounding architecture and the observer which activates the photographs and gives them their imagery. There is an immanent reflection on the relation between body and vision at work, our perceptual and embodied experience is being put forward. For Merleau-Ponty, the mirror is emblematic of a certain way of seeing: the mirror image anticipates the labour of vision. In this sense Deschenes’ works can be seen as an investigation of the act of seeing itself. The observer of an exhibited work bears witness to his own reflection, the act of seeing becomes visible.

The language and mechanisms of photography are self-consciously referenced and activate questions of representation, modes of seeing and the network as the medium in which it operates. While the silver photograms are the result of black and white photographic paper being exposed to light during the night, for the black photogram the artist has exposed colour photosensitive paper to light during the day. ‘Light – writing’ (Photo-graphy) – the inscription with light which stands at the beginning of a photograph is here reversed to the point where light becomes shadow. The overexposure to light creates a black surface, a ‘misphotograph’ in a certain way.

While the photograms circumvent the camera for the formation of the image, the optical device is reintroduced in a series of five photographs that are exhibited alongside the non-representational works. Gamma depicts a focal chart which is used to calibrate lenses in photography. The vision and labour of the photographer here ultimately encounter the image; and the body of the viewer.

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. Sutton Lane will present a two person exhibition with Liz Deschenes and Blake Rayne at Art Basel Miami Beach this December.
The artist’s work is part of the permanent collections of The Walker Art Center; The Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum, New York; the Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C.; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on-Hudson.

Systems Analysis

15 Oct, 2010-11 Dec, 2010

West London Projects, London

no images were found

Please visit West London Projects website

Right / Left

22 Oct, 2009-28 Nov, 2009

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Liz Deschenes
Right / Left
22 October – 28 November 2009
Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Sutton Lane is pleased to present Liz Deschenes’ first solo exhibition in Paris. On view are four large photograms, non-representational images which are the result of exposing photosensitive paper to outdoor light in the night. Through applying silver toner to the black and white photographic paper the artist produces slightly reflective sheets, records of the specific physical conditions they were exposed to and of the chemical interaction between light and certain substances.

The works are void of all representational content and circumvent the camera – the optical device normally used for the formation of the image – reflecting on the procedures that intersect in photography. Deschenes uses this exploration of photographic processes as a tool to investigate photography itself, the way the medium has been positioned and historicized as well as its relationship to other practices.

In the present installation the works are placed off the centre on the wall referring to the difference between the monocular vision of the camera and the human binocular vision.

The conventions of reading and looking are put into play reversing the expectations of the viewer.

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. She recently participated in Colour Chart at Tate Liverpool and MoMA, New York curated by Ann Temkin. Her work was also included in the The Art Institute of Chicago’s Modern Wing Inaugural Installation of Contemporary Photography curated by Matthew Witkovski (2009).

The artist’s work is part of the permanent collection of The Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, the Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C., the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C and CCS Bard Hessel Museum, Annandale-on-Hudson.

Chromatic Aberration (Red Screen, Green Screen, Blue Screen – a series of Photographs from 2001 to 2008)

15 Oct, 2009-13 Nov, 2009

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

La Vie mode d’emploi

21 Mar, 2009-02 May, 2009

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

no images were found

La Vie mode d’emploi
Carl Andre, Martin Barré, Daniel Buren, Liz Deschenes, Sherrie Levine, Cheyney Thompson, Franz West
21 March – 2 May 2009
Sutton Lane, Paris

La Vie mode d’emploi
The Chiasmus: Why is the chiasmus the last great form of truth—the only one we have left?

La Vie mode d’emploi: Percival Bartelbooth, the hero of Perec’s great novel, plans to use up his life, and his fortune, without leaving a trace. Despite lacking any talent, he apprentices himself for ten years to a watercolorist. He then travels the world for twenty years. At each of five hundred ports Bartlebooth paints a watercolor and sends it back to Paris, where it is converted into a puzzle. Bartlebooth returns to Paris, solving the puzzles one-by-one and then shipping each to the location where it had been painted: there, after twenty years, they are dissolved.

The Chiasmus: The more stringent and mechanical the program, the more human does its author, or subject, become: this is Bartlebooth’s truth. As with the dance, so—always—with the dancer: Perec, a most poignant and ethical writer, is famous for only working with the most rigid, stratospheric constraints. La Disparition was written without the letter E. Each chapter in La Vie mode d’emploi simply describes a room in a Parisian apartment block; the reader moves from room-to-room as a knight on a chessboard. Only by way of these most rigorous, elegant systems can Perec tell of Bartlebooth’s rigorous and elegant puzzle, or game, or life; only by disappearing as a writer can he write the truth of our inevitable disappearance.

La Vie mode d’emploi: « Does he have hands? Does he have a face? Then it wasn’t us. » The Chiasmus: Not coincidentally, all this takes place at or by the sea.

David Lewis

24 November – 22 December

24 Nov, 2007-22 Dec, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Photographs

31 May, 2007-30 Jun, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

Liz Deschenes
Photographs
May 31 – June 30 2007

Sutton Lane is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in London of Liz Deschenes.

The most recent investigation entitled Moirés are made from placing two negatives in the enlarger of the same image (perforated paper) slightly out of registration to create distinct patterns. The Moiré series defy two separate expectations of the photographic medium – depiction of a past event, and a static representation of that moment. Due to the physical affect of the after images, the work appears to move and reconfigure, challenging preconceptions of photography’s roles and its relationship to architectural space or site.

In the second gallery, Deschenes is presenting a series from 2003 entitled Black and White. This project continues her interest of examining the omnipresent screen, from its analog beginnings to its digital present.

In Black and White Deschenes questions the importance and relevance of the distinction between colour and black and white photographs. Early colour processes used dyed layers of black and white materials and even now, this layer process is the base of Kodachrome and Dye Transfer printing, as well as a concept in Photoshop. In this exhibition Deschenes presents images of screens, real and implied, in both black and white and colour. One photograph of a plasma screen reveals white light to be an equal combination of red, green, and blue pixels, printed to appear black at a distance. Light from an enlarger was used to make
two silvery grey photograms proportionate to a digital and analog screen. These black and white prints (commonly referred to as Gelatin Silver prints) simultaneously allude to the materiality of black and white photographs and the motion picture silver screen. All of these untraditional photographs are displayed in standard aluminum frames. In using these frames Deschenes references this photographic tradition first used for presenting and preserving Alfred Stieglitz’s work in 1959. The window mats are not entirely standard; the images are over-matted with proportions referencing aspect ratios, utilized in both film and television.

Finally in the first Gallery installed with the Moirés, is a photographic series entitled, Photographs. They are silver – toned black and white photograms with no imagery or content. They look and function similarly to mirrors. Daguerreotypes,
one of the initial photographic processes, are often referred to as mirrors with a memory. These photographs share the uniqueness of daguerreotypes, the silver reflectivity, and the mercurial viewing experience. The viewer activates the work, and becomes an integral part of a temporal, unrecorded representation.

“My artistic practice has been completely immersed in the photographic medium.
As an exhibiting artist, curator, and educator, I have worked to expand the
dialogue surrounding Photography. I believe that there is a schism between the
way it has been practiced, and how it’s been considered.
I am interested in Photography cultivating a self-reflexive dialogue, while simultaneously reflecting the world at large, and utilizing a vocabulary that integrates concept with form.”

Liz Deschenes lives and works in New York. In 2007 her work was part of the group exhibition For the People of Paris and had a solo exhibition at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York. Liz Deschenes currently teaches at Columbia University, at Milton Avery School of the Arts, Bard College and the graduate department of Photography and Related Media at School of Visual Arts, New York. Her work is part of the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum, New York, the Corcoran Museum of Art, Washington D.C. and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

For the People of Paris

13 Jan, 2007-10 Feb, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London