CHRISTIAN BONNEFOI
SARAH CHARLESWORTH
LIZ DESCHENES
ROE ETHRIDGE
JUTTA KOETHER
DANIEL LEFCOURT
VALENTINA LIERNUR
JASON LOEBS
SCOTT LYALL
NICK MAUSS
CHARLES MAYTON
JOHN MILLER
OLIVIER MOSSET
SEAN PAUL
JULIA PHILLIPS
EILEEN QUINLAN
BLAKE RAYNE
CLEMENT RODZIELSKI
CHRISTOPH RUCKHÄBERLE
NORA SCHULTZ
AMY SILLMAN
REENA SPAULINGS
JOANNE TATHAM & TOM O’SULLIVAN
CHEYNEY THOMPSON

DANIEL LEFCOURT

Born in 1975, New York City

Lives and Works in New York City

 

EDUCATION

2005 Master of Fine Arts, Columbia University, New York

1997 Bachelor of Fine Arts, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence


PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

MOCA – Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles


SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2015 « Tête« , Campoli Presti, Paris

« Anti-Scans« , Campoli Presti, London

Blum and Poe, Los Angeles

2014 « A Moveable Feast – Part VI », Campoli Presti, Paris

« Cast »,  Campoli Presti, London

2013 « Art Statements with Campoli Presti », Art Basel

Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York

2012 « Debris field », Campoli Presti, Paris

« Marginal Utility », ICA, Pennsylvania

« Mock up », White flags project, Saint-Louis Missouri

2011 « Active Surplus », Marginal Utility, Philadelphia

« Prepared Ground », Taxter & Spengemann, New York

2009 « Plot Fill », Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

« Check », Gallery Luis Campaña, Berlin

2007 « Reversed and Remanded », Galerie Mitterrand + Sanz, Zurich

« Interim Agreement », Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

2006 « Breach of Contract », Taxter and Spengemann, New York

2005 « Everything is Here », Groeflin | Maag Gallerie, Basel, Switzerland

2004 « Put All Doubt to Rest », Taxter and Spengemann, New York


GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2016 « Group Exhibition« , Campoli Presti, Paris

2015 « Space and Matter« , Sperone Westwater, New York

« Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan Wagner« , Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

2014 « Copied », Andrew Roth Gallery, New York

« Aaron Bobrow, Daniel Lefcourt, Davina Semo », Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York

2013 « Artist Web Project », Dia Art Foundation, New York

« Beyond The Object », Brand New Gallery, Milan

« Jew York », Jach Feuer & Untitled Gallery, New York

2012 « First Among Equals », ICA, Philadelphia

« Second Nature: Abstract photography then and now », deCordova Park and Museum, Lincoln

« Real to Real: Photographs from the Traina Collection », de Young Museum, San Francisco

« The Blind Cut », Marlborough Gallery, New York

2011 « Matryoshka », Recess, New York

« Dispatch Superimpose », Print Edition Launch at NY Art Book Fair, MoMA P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City

2010 « GRØUP SHØW », Taxter & Spengemann, New York

« Knights Move », Scultpure Center, New York

« Solid State », Bureau, New York « Luxus der Empfindsamkeit », Luis Campaña Galerie, Cologne

« Choit », Griffin, Hubbard, Lefcourt at Dispatch, New York

« Foundation for Contemporary Arts Benefit », Lehmann Maupin, New York

2009 « The Perpetual Dialogue », Andrea Rosen, New York

« My Summer », Galerie Lelong, New York

« New Ground Underground », Stonecape Collection Norah & Norman Stone, Calistoga

2008 « Subject Index », Malmo Konsthall, Malmo

« Useful Gestures / Useless Gesture », Dispatch

« Union Square », Taxter and Spengemann, New York

2007″Past, Present, Future Perfect: Selections from the Ovitz Family Collection » », H&R Block Artspace at The Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City

« Forced Abdication », Luis Campaña Galerie, Cologne

« Concrete works », Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York

« For the People of Paris », Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti) Paris

« Practical F/X », Mary Boone Gallery, New York

« Collecting and Collectivity », Conduit Gallery, Dallas

2006″The Gold Standard », PS 1 Contemporary Arts Center, Long Island City

« Everything Beautiful and Noble is the Result of Reason and Calculation », curated by Howie Chen and Gabrielle Giattino, EFA Gallery, New York

Clarissa Dalrymple’s Exhibition of Young Artists to Benefit the Center for Contemporary Arts, Bartolami Dayan, New York

« Dice Thrown », curated by Joao Ribas, Bellwether, New York

« Practical F/X », Mary Boone Gallery, New York

« Fountains », D’Amelio Terras, New York

2005″Do You Like Stuff? », The Suiss Institute, New York

« Day Labor », P.S.1/MoMA Institute for Contemporary Art, New York

« Makers », Taxter and Spengemann, New York

« The General’s Jamboree », Guild & Greyshkul, New York

« Anima(r)tions », Galleria Sogospatti, Rome

2004 « Fresh Meat », CEPA Gallery, Buffalo, New York

« Mystery Achievement », Taxter & Spengemann, New York

« The Block », Gallerie Une in Auverier, Switzerland

« A Different World Like Ours », Vox Populi Gallery in Philadelphia

2003 « Animations », Kunst Werke, Berlin

« The Low End Theory », Minnesota Center for Photography, Minneapolis

« Protest and Destroy », Oni Gallery, Boston

2002 « Animations », P.S.1/MoMA Institute for Contemporary Art, New York

« Salon IV », Oni Gallery, Boston

2001 « Everybody Now », Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College, New York

« New Work from New York », Cheekwood Museum of Art, Nashville

2000 « Greater New York », P.S.1 Institute for Contemporary Art, New York

« Somewhat Corrupt: Digital Art », Fordham University, New York


BIBLIOGRAPHY

2015 “Daniel Lefcourt”, Aude Launay, 02 Zerodeux, Winter 2015-2016

2014  « Daniel Lefcourt », Reviews in Brief, Modern Painters, June

2013  « Must-see Painting Shows: June 2013 », Huffpost Arts & Culture, June

D’Agostino, Paul, « Daniel Lefcourt », The L Magazine, June 6

“Modeling Art: Daniel Lefcourt at Michell- Innes & Nash”, Lucy Li, artcritical

2012 « The Traina Collection » (exhibition catalogue), de Young Museum, Kevin Moore & Julian Cox

The Blind Cut (exhibition catalogue), Marlborough Gallery, New York, January

Andrew Blackley, Superimpose (review), Art in Print, January-February

2011 “Prepared ground”, Airdaily.org, April

“Goings on about town – Art”, The New York Times, March 21

“December First Friday,” PhiladelphiaWeekly.com, November 30

Daniel Gerwin, “Daniel Lefourt, Active Surplus,” Title-Magazine.com, December 14

2010 “Knight’s Move” (exhibition catalogue), Scultpure Center, Long Island City

2009 « Art in Review: the Perpetual Dialogue », Holland Cotter, The New York Times, Friday, January 8, P.C32

2008 « Subject Index », (exh.catalogue), Malmo KonstMuseum, Malmo, Sweden

2009 « Art in Review: the Perpetual Dialogue », Holland Cotter, The New York Times, Friday, January 8, P.C32

2007 « Warnschauss traf Tur des Fluchtwagens », 20 minuten, June 12, 2007, p.3

« For the People of Paris », Paris (exh.catalogue)

« Daniel Lefcourt », Taxter & Spengemann, Katie Stone Sonnenborn, Frieze, Issue #104, Jan – Feb, 2007

« Collectivism and Collaboration », Charissa N.Terranova & Noah Simblist, Art Lies, Issue #56, Winter, 2007

2006 « Daniel Lefcourt », Emily Hall, Artforum, November 2006

Art in Review: « Dice Thrown (Will Never Annul Chance) » Roberta Smith, The New York Times, Fri 3 November

« Dice Thrown (Will Never Annul Chance), » The New Yorker, November 6, 2006, p.25

« Dice Thrown, » Time Out New York, November 2-8, 2006, Issue 579.

Art in Review: « Daniel Lefcourt, » Roberta Smith, The New York Times, September 29, 2006, p. E33.

Critic’s Notebook: « Chelsea Is a Battlefield: Galleries Muster Groups, » Roberta Smith, The New York Times, July 28, 2006, p. E33.

Review: « Everything Beautiful and Noble Is the Result of Reason and Calculation, » Cecilia Alemani, Critics’ Picks: New York, www.artforum.com, week of February 20, 2006

2005 « What’s In A Name, » Kelly Devine Thomas, ARTnews, November, 2005

« Like a Rock, » Jerry Saltz, The Village Voice, Dec. 21, 2004 – January 2, 2005

2004 « Mystery Achievement », Emily Speers Mears, Critics’Picks, New York, www.artforum.com, October 5, 2004

« Weekend Update, » Walter Robinson, September 18th , 2004, artnet.com.

Artworks:Money, Edited by Katy Siegel, London: Thames and Hudson, 2004

2003 « Animations », Exhibition Catalog, Curated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, Berlin: Kunst Werke, 2003

2001 « The Histories Series, » Grace Glueck, New York Times, Nov 30th

2000 « A Day in the City (5th Avenue) » P.S.1 Writers Project, Alan Moore, 2000

1999 « GoGlobal », Cate McQuaid, The Boston Globe, December 9th, 1999


PUBLISHED WRITINGS

Catalog Essay: An Allegory for the Allegorist, Kevin Zucker, New York: Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, 2007

Interview with Allan McCollum, NDP #3, New York: North Drive Press, 2006


LECTURES 

2009 Invited Lectures:

Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA

Ontario College of Art & Design, Toronto, ON

Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY

University of Texas, Arlington, TX

2007 Visiting Artist Lecture and Critic, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI

2006 Visiting Artist Lecture, City College of New York, NY

no images were found

24 November – 22 December

24 Nov, 2007-22 Dec, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Interim Agreement

15 Sep, 2007-13 Oct, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), Paris

Daniel Lefcourt
Interim Agreement
15 September – 13 October 2007

« Non-denial denial is a term for a particular kind of equivocation; specifically, an apparent denial that appears to be direct, clearcut and unambiguous when heard, but on further examination is not a denial at all. A non-denial denial is not a lie per se, because what is said is literally true, but is instead a form of deception known as an evasion.
The phrase was popularized during the Watergate era by Woodward and Bernstein in their book All the President’s Men, in reference to evasive statements by then-Attorney-General John Mitchell. »
– « Non-denial denial » from Wikipedia.

For the inaugural exhibition of its new location 6 rue de Braque, Sutton Lane is pleased to announce the first exhibition in Paris of New York artist Daniel Lefcourt. In the show the artist will present a group of new sculptures and dust drawings.

Lefcourt’s painting like horizontal arrangements of beautifully finished strips of MDF board painted black further explore the correlation between painting and sculpture while at the same time reflecting concerns with formal strategies of art and abstract language.
In dialogue with his dust drawings these works can be seen as signs of absence, “evasive statements” which allude to that which has been negated or denied.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He received his MFA from Columbia University in 2005. He has had solo exhibitions at Taxter and Spengemann in New York, in 2004 and 2006. Lefcourt’s work has been featured in numerous group shows including Greater New York in 2000 and The Gold Standard in 2006, Museum of Modern Art P.S.1; Do You Like Stuff?, Swiss Institute in New York; and For the People of Paris, Sutton Lane Paris.
His work has been reviewed in ArtForum, The New York Times, Frieze, The New Yorker, ArtNews, ArtNet.com, The Boston Globe and has been included in publications such as
Artworks: Money, by Katy Seigel.

Plot Fill

16 May, 2009-25 Jul, 2009

Sutton Lane (Campoli Prest), London

no images were found

Daniel Lefcourt
Plot Fill
16 May – 13 June 2009
Sutton Lane, London

Sutton Lane is pleased to present the first solo exhibition in London of New York based artist Daniel Lefcourt.

On view are four solid wooden objects, two transparency projections and two drawings on acetate. The transparencies are output using a computer pen-plotting device. The solid wooden pieces are output by a computer-controlled router, which both carves and cuts-out forms that are filled or outlined.

Throughout the exhibition Lefcourt explores written and visual language, a mutually inclusive interaction where text and image is mirrored and displaced. Meaning is simultaneously constructed and evaded, deflected and defined. The scale, placement, visual repetition, and graphic contrast of each work seem to be heavily weighted with signification, yet what this work signifies is left conspicuously open.

The artworks reflect on the particularly contemporary condition of dematerialised image production. The works originate as numeric geometry that has no inherent scale yet these are output as physical drawings and solid wooden objects.

Within the exhibition the artist displays the different elements to his work examining the process of production, at the same time investigating modes of display.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He received his MFA from Columbia University in 2005.
He has an upcoming solo exhibition at Luis Campaña in Berlin. His work will be included in a group exhibition at Gallery Lelong, New York opening in June. He has had solo exhibitions at Sutton Lane, Paris (2007), Galerie Mitterand + Sanz, Zurich (2007), Taxter and Spengemann in New York (2006). Lefcourt’s work has been featured in numerous group shows including Subject Index at Malmo Kunstmuseum (2008), The Gold Standard (2006) and Greater New York (2000) at Museum of Modern Art P.S.1 and Do You Like Stuff? at Swiss Institute in New York (2005).

Debris Field

02 Jun, 2012-28 Jul, 2012

Campoli Presti, Paris

no images were found

Daniel Lefcout
Debris Field
2 – 28 July 2012
Campoli Presti, Paris

For his second solo exhibition in Paris, Daniel Lefcourt presents Debris Field, a series of monochrome oil paintings on linen. The pleasure and mystery of these paintings is embedded in the strange topography of the surfaces. Brush strokes, bubbling liquids, soaking paper, the folds of fabric, broken fragments, woodgrain, and minute specks of dust are dispersed across the picture plane of each artwork. While some of the marks and textures are the result of direct material procedures, others are highly mediated – having been digitally fabricated and cast using a specially formulated gesso painting ground. The result is a series of artworks suspended between disclosure and concealment, mineral and liquid, analog and digital, directness and substitution, material fact and the specter of representation.

The following is a brief summary of the process provided by the artist:
1. Actions and Materials:
An event (or session) is staged. Various materials are dispersed across the studio floor using a variety of actions such as pouring, scattering, breaking, and sweeping.

2. Capturing and Modeling:
Digital photos are taken at various points throughout the event. The digital images are transformed into low-relief 3-d computer models.

3. Mold-making and Casting:
The 3-d models are fabricated using a computer-controlled router (The models are inverted to create a negative mold). Specially formulated acrylic gesso paint is brushed and poured into the mold in multiple layers. When the final layers have dried, the cast paint is removed from the mold.

4. Finishing & Result:
Linen is adhered to the back of the paint and then stretched on strainer bars. a graphite-based oil paint is applied in a final layer across the entire surface.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. He received his MFA from Columbia University in 2005. He has had solo exhibitions at Taxter and Spengemann in New York (2006), Sutton Lane, Paris (2007), Galerie Mitterand + Sanz, Zurich (2007), Sutton Lane, London (2009), Taxter and Spengemann (2011). In 2012 he has also presented Marginal Utility, ICA, Pennsylvania and Mock up, White flags project, Saint-Louis. Lefcourt’s work has been featured in numerous group shows including The Gold Standard (2006) and Greater New York (2000) at Museum of Modern Art P.S.1, Do You Like Stuff? at Swiss Institute in New York (2005), Subject Index at Malmo Kunstmuseum (2008), and Knights Move, Sculpture Center, New York (2010).

Art / 44 / Basel Statements with Daniel Lefcourt

13 Jun, 2013-16 Jun, 2013

Basel

A Moveable Feast – Part VI

01 Mar, 2014-15 Mar, 2014

Campoli Presti, Paris

A Moveable Feast – Part VI
Daniel Lefcourt
1 – 15 March 2014
Campoli Presti, Paris

Campoli Presti is pleased to announce the sixth iteration of the ongoing exhibition A Moveable Feast with the display of the work Passive Surplus (2011) by Daniel Lefcourt. As in previous instalments of A Moveable Feast, the exhibition focuses on one work that has been decisive in the artist’s practice.

Daniel Lefcourt produces surfaces of strange topography, often formed by material traces of his working process that are dispersed across the picture plane of each piece. The result is a series of works that reflect on the material fact and its spectre of representation, the relationship between directness and mediation, and the architectural simulation involved in exhibition display.

The work on view is composed of a transparency projector (the outmoded technology once used for school and business presentations) pointing at a “screen” made of fibreboard that is installed in such a way that it resembles a painting or a large photograph. What is projected is not an image, but instead is actual sawdust that has been scattered directly onto the projector box. The hue of the wood in combination with the light of the projection creates a golden illumination of the transient aleatory composition.

Speaking to multiple disciplines and histories, Lefcourt considers Passive Surplus to be among the most significant of his works. It succinctly articulates the artist’s interests in physical and virtual surfaces; chance and other non-compositional techniques; and the calculated manipulation of the conventions of exhibition design and display.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in New York. His work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including MoMA P.S.1; the Sculpture Center, Long Island City; ICA Philadelphia; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Malmö Konstmuseum and Kunst-Werke Berlin. In 2013 the Dia Art Foundation commissioned a web project by the artist. He received his MFA from Columbia University and is a member of the faculty of Rhode Island School of Design.

Cast

13 Feb, 2014-22 Mar, 2014

Campoli Presti, London

Daniel Lefcourt
Cast
13 February – 22 March 2014
Campoli Presti, London

“I was digging through a forum for machine operators and sign makers. Most of the threads had predictable subjects – surface finishing techniques, prototyping and modeling, etc. – but then I stumbled on a post under the subject accidental cryogenics. I figured it was spam, but there was a post inside. My phone died as I was reading it – but I had already copied part of the text. When I tried to find the post again later it had been removed. It read:

…I was alive, I think, but I had become strangely inert. A certain numbness was coming over me. It was as though I had passed through some kind of screen. It wasn’t necessarily horrible. It didn’t feel like a nightmare. It was just blank, desensitized, anesthetized. I was thankful almost. So much of the disharmony of my everyday existence was fading. I must have looked dead or frozen, but my heart was beating. I felt connected to everything. My nervous system extended infinitely. I no longer slept. I no longer ate. No more pain. I was disassociated from the earth, but I had connected to a kind of pure mathematics. I became infinitely replicable. I could be anywhere, but I remained present. I was less fragile, less transient, more abstract. I could survive anything. I was sure this thing-like existence would last…

The text struck me as an allegory. More importantly, I realized it could be a working method.”

– Daniel Lefcourt

Campoli Presti is pleased to present Daniel Lefcourt’s fourth solo exhibition with the gallery. Cast comprises large relief paintings on canvas and panel within a modified exhibition framework. All of the works are structured around a set of oppositions between: image and object, directness and mediation, simulated and real.

Through the exploration of these themes Lefcourt has developed a complex set of procedures to create the paintings. His techniques use aspects of photography, computer modeling, digital fabrication, and sculptural casting. All of the works in the exhibition are derived from improvised chance procedures performed under the macro-lens of a digital camera. The minute movements of paint, dust, and debris are then recreated as low relief 3-dimensional computer models. The model is then enlarged and carved into foam molds using computer-aided machining. Finally, paint is brushed into the mold, allowed to dry, peeled up and adhered to canvas.

Similarly, the works on panel use computer-aided machining, except here the image is carved directly into fiberboard. Lefcourt’s expertise in machine operation allows him to design and modify the specific tool-path with which each work is carved. The works are then meticulously finished either with transparent resin, or a combination of graphite and polyurethane that serves to articulate the minute details of the surface.

Lefcourt’s work reflects on contemporary digital image production while negotiating the reality of material procedures. He is interested in the moment in which the virtual, the simulated confronts the physical reality of the image. This interest extends into the language of framing and exhibition architecture, the pine frames and fiberboard walls address conventions of display, testing the relation between model, simulation and the material object.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in New York. His work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including MoMA P.S.1; the Sculpture Center, Long Island; ICA Philadelphia; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Malmö Konstmuseum and Kunst-Werke Berlin. In 2013 the Dia Art Foundation commissioned a web project by the artist. He received his MFA from Columbia University and is a member of the faculty of Rhode Island School of Design.

Anti-Scans

13 Oct, 2015-14 Nov, 2015

Campoli Presti, London

no images were found

Daniel Lefcourt
Anti-Scans
13 October – 14 November 2015
Campoli Presti, London

Campoli Presti is pleased to present Anti-Scans, Daniel Lefcourt’s sixth exhibition with the gallery. Throughout his career, Lefcourt has continually engaged the space between painting and technical imaging. By using scientific, commercial, and military technologies to create his work, Lefcourt draws painting into the broader conflicts and politics of representation.

To create his new series of paintings, Lefcourt has used 3-D scanning techniques (photogrammetry, laser) originally developed for the fields of archeology, forensics and cartography. While the scientific fields that use these methods are concerned most of all with accuracy, Lefcourt uses 3D scanning as the basis for a material play with the languages of painting.

The works featured in Anti-Scans present surfaces and supports such as canvas and wood, as well as painting media and pigment. The reflections and movement of the paint while it is still in motion creates unpredictable distortions in the scanned model – what was a smooth reflective surface might translate as a crystalline structure, or simply an empty gap – while the detailed surfaces on which the paint sits, create a legible, if artificial, ground.

Anti-Scans are precise recordings of the material world, but they are also a kind of digital hallucination. The scans are simultaneously highly detailed, yet filled with errors and glitches. These temporary aberrations have been captured, enlarged, and ‘stored’ as paint on canvas. Counter-intuitively, it is the errors in the scans – and the subtle variation in each painting – that serve to register the material basis of digital input and output.

Alongside the paintings are two new pairs of drawings that conflate various historical methods of image production. Over the course of the past year Lefcourt has created a large set of rubber stamps using a laser engraver – all the imagery relating to the paintings, and to the production of technical images in general. For Lefcourt, this collection of stamps is a kind of historical database – each image stored in rubber hardware. This database can be queried, returning the results by hand-printing each stamp individually, in varying tones and sequences.

While the works at first appear to be descriptive and ‘readable’, this apparent legibility is continually frustrated and postponed. Instead we are left with a rigorously abstract set of artworks. Ultimately, the Query drawings are a rebus, structured by rhythm and sequence.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in New York. His work forms part of the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and MOCA – Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Lefcourt’s work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including MoMA P.S.1; the Sculpture Center, Long Island City; ICA Philadelphia; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Malmö Konstmuseum and Kunst-Werke Berlin. In 2013 the Dia Art Foundation commissioned a web project by the artist. He received his MFA from Columbia University and is a member of the faculty of Rhode Island School of Design.

For the People of Paris

13 Jan, 2007-10 Feb, 2007

Sutton Lane (Campoli Presti), London

no images were found

Group exhibition celebrating Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagners donation to the Whitney and Pompidou

09 Jun, 2016-15 Jul, 2016

Campoli Presti, Paris

Tête

21 Oct, 2015-18 Dec, 2015

Campoli Presti, Paris

no images were found

Daniel Lefcourt
Tête
21 October – 18 December 2015
Campoli Presti, Paris

Campoli Presti is pleased to present Tête, Daniel Lefcourt’s seventh exhibition with the gallery, and the first exhibition of his green Cast paintings in France. These are the final two paintings from the Cast series, a major body of work that began in 2013. Throughout his career, Lefcourt has continually engaged the space between painting and technical imaging. By using scientific, commercial, and military technologies to create his work, Lefcourt draws painting into the broader conflicts and politics of representation.

To create the Cast paintings, Lefcourt begins by using “remote sensing” techniques. In the field of cartography, the term “remote sensing” refers to any technique used to measure spatial or dimensional information – aerial photography, photoclinometry, laser and structured light scanning, are all ways of acquiring dimensional data without physically touching the object of study. Working on a small scale, Lefcourt creates an aleatory terrain using paint, pigment, water, canvas, and board, which he then photographs from multiple angles and elevations in order to generate a low relief terrain model in a 3D software environment.

This spatial data is then output as painting: First the terrain model is machine fabricated in foam as a relief mold, paint is then brushed in to the carved mold, and finally the dry paint is peeled up as a sculptural skin and adhered to canvas. The result is a series of paintings that play with perceptual paradoxes. The works engage us with their physical, corporeal, presence, yet simultaneously they appear to continually recede.

Alongside the Cast paintings is a new pair of drawings that conflate various historical methods of image production. Over the course of the past year Lefcourt has created a large set of rubber stamps using a laser engraver – all the imagery relating to the paintings, and to the production of technical images in general. For Lefcourt, the collection of stamps is a kind of historical database – each image stored in rubber hardware. This database can be queried, returning the results by hand-printing each stamp individually, in varying tones and sequences.

While the drawings at first appear to be descriptive and “readable”, this apparent legibility is continually frustrated and postponed. Instead we are left with a rigorously abstract set of artworks. Ultimately, the “Query” drawings are a rebus, structured by rhythm, meter, and sequence.

The title of the exhibition is a reference to the French painter Jean Fautrier, specifically his Otage series. Fautrier spent time during the war keeping a low profile in a sanatorium just south of Paris where he had a makeshift studio. It was here that Fautrier began his Otage series, which includes Tete d’Otage. The works were a response to events unfolding in the woods outside his studio where Nazi forces were torturing and killing prisoners. Never having viewed his subject directly, Fautrier’s painting process can be thought of as another type of “remote sensing”.

Daniel Lefcourt lives and works in New York. His work forms part of the collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and MOCA – Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Lefcourt’s work has been featured in numerous exhibitions including MoMA P.S.1; the Sculpture Center, Long Island City; ICA Philadelphia; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Malmö Konstmuseum and Kunst-Werke Berlin. In 2013 the Dia Art Foundation commissioned a web project by the artist. He received his MFA from Columbia University and is a member of the faculty of Rhode Island School of Design.